Eat Wild Salmon and Savor Bristol Bay

Seattle Restaurants and Markets Help Trout Unlimited Alaska to Protect Bristol Bay Salmon from Mine Threat

Save Bristol Bay, Salmon Factory of the World

Freshly caught wild salmon, direct from the pristine waters of Bristol Bay, Alaska, will arrive in restaurants and seafood cases in Portland and Seattle early next month as part of Trout Unlimited Alaska’s Savor Bristol Bay campaign.

By participating in Savor Bristol Bay week, businesses and consumers are supporting Trout Unlimited Alaska’s grassroots Save Bristol Bay campaign.

Savor Bristol Bay

Bristol Bay is not only rich with wild salmon, but it’s also where developers want to build a massive, open-pit copper and gold mine called Pebble in the headwaters of some of the most productive fish habitat left on the planet. The proposed mine threatens to pollute the waters of Bristol Bay and harm

what is the world’s largest sockeye salmon run. Trout Unlimited Alaska is working with a diverse coalition of food community members, Alaska Native leaders, commercial and sport fishermen and many others to gain permanent protection for Bristol Bay.

During the week of July 4 to 10, Slow Food Seattle supporters are encouraged to support Bristol Bay salmon by Voting with Their Forks at participating businesses. They can also purchase salmon from Seattle’s PCC Natural Markets and Seattle Fish Company.

Seattle’s Restaurants and Markets supporting Savor Bristol Bay week:

Chef Becky  Selengut (photo: Valentina Vitols)

Chef Becky Selengut (photo: Valentina Vitols)

If you are looking for a hands on approach to satisfying your seafood cravings, join Chef Becky Selengut at the Edmonds PCC on Wednesday, July 7th for her Bristol Bay Salmon Cooking class. Class menu includes: Quinoa cakes with wok-smoked king salmon and herbs; Bristol Bay salmon with watercress soup, chile oil and croutons; Slow cooked sockeye salmon with Columbia Valley red wine sauce and braised fennel. For details and to sign up for the class visit: www.brownpapertickets.com/event/112619

Red GoldWant to see the beauty of Bristol Bay for yourself but don’t have a float plane? Free screenings of the award-winning Bristol Bay documentary, Red Gold, will be held throughout the week. In Seattle, Roy Street Coffee & Tea will screen Red Gold at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, July 6 and at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, July 8. Watch the film while nibbling on salmon snacks prepared by Seattle Chefs!

“We’re pleased to be a part of Savor Bristol Bay week. With West Coast wild salmon fisheries struggling the last few years, we want to do what we can to keep Bristol Bay sockeye plentiful and healthy so that we can keep offering sustainable wild salmon to our guests,” said Chef Kevin Davis, owner of Seattle-based Steelhead Diner and Blueacre Seafood.

Learn more about Savor Bristol Bay week and what you can do to get involved at www.savebristolbay.org

Trout UnlimitedFor more information contact:
Amy Grondin
ajgrondin@gmail.com
206.295.4931

Savor Bristol Bay Week in Seattle: July 4-10

Bristol Bay fishing boat

Photo: Nick Hall

It’s almost summer time and with summer comes fresh wild salmon to restaurants, seafood markets and backyard BBQ’s! In the Pacific Northwest we are savvy to the fact that not all salmon taste the same. Depending on their species, what the fish were feeding on and the river run that the salmon are a part of each fish will vary slightly and have its own unique taste profile. This gives many reasons to serve a variety of sustainably caught wild salmon from the waters of Washington, Oregon and Alaska.

Slow Food Seattle is partnering with Trout Unlimited to celebrate our nation’s largest wild salmon fishery during Savor Bristol Bay Week: July 4-10.

Bristol Bay Salmon

Photo: Nick Hall

Bristol Bay’s salmon and story are coming back to the Northwest during the peak of the fishing season. Each day more chefs from our Slow Food Seattle Restaurants are saying “Yes” to featuring Bristol Bay salmon on their menus during Savor Bristol Bay Week. In the July Slow Food newsletter we’ll provide a list of places you can go to Vote with Your Fork” for Bristol Bay.

We are planning a number of events in the Seattle area so you can be a part of the celebration. Four events are planned for the Savor Bristol Bay week:

  • Tuesday, July 6 & Thursday, July 8 – Two free screenings of the award winning documentary RED GOLD at Roy Street Coffee, both showings will be at 7:30pm.
  • Wednesday, July 7 – Wild Salmon cooking class and dinner with Chef Becky Selengut at Edmonds PCC, 6:30pm to 9pm. Come Savor Bristol Bay and learn new ways to prepare Bristol Bay salmon at home as well as information about Bristol Bay’s salmon fishery and the things that make it so unique. (Tickets here; RSVP details on Facebook). On the menu: Quinoa cakes with wok-smoked king salmon and herbs; Bristol Bay salmon with watercress soup, chile oil and croutons; Slow cooked sockeye salmon with Columbia Valley red wine sauce and braised fennel.

Until July brings us the opening of Bristol Bay salmon season, you can learn more about this amazing place and wild salmon fishery from Trout Unlimited’s online sources:

  • WhyWild is part of Trout Unlimited’s Pacific Salmon Program with the purpose to educate and engage the salmon marketplace in Trout Unlimited’s wild salmon and steelhead conservation efforts from California through Alaska. From fish facts to what wine to serve when you “eat it to save it” you can find it all things wild salmon on this website!
  • Save Bristol Bay – This Trout Unlimited website will give you an overview of Bristol Bay – the place, the people, the environment and the issues – all presented with beautiful images that inspire and move you to learn more about the incredible Bristol Bay watershed and how to preserve it for future generation of both people and animals.

    Savor Bristol Bay
    BB Regional Seafood Development Association

    Trout Unlimited

Walnuts to Liqueur: Making Nocino with Chef Beth Maxey

Green Walnuts**This event has been rescheduled to July 31st, from 12:00-1:30**

Nocino is a traditional Italian liqueur made with green walnuts, spices and alcohol. It has a rich earthy flavor and is delicious as a digestive, over ice cream and as a reduction over duck breast…

Join Slow Food Seattle board member Chef Beth Maxey from 12:00 pm -1:30 pm on Saturday July 31st for a free hands-on Nocino making event in Volunteer Park and in an online community in the upcoming weeks as we share tips and forage for green walnuts (which are plentiful around the city).

Nocino making traditionally takes place during and after the festival of St. John the Baptist, where families and communities gather to feast and celebrate. Though we’re not celebrating a religious event, we’d love to preserve the conviviality of a community gathering. I’ll share my recipe from Italy as well as discuss regional variations and some of the technicalities of extractions. We’ll mix and mash nuts and flavorings and plan a follow-up tasting to see who really got it right. Also, since we will not add alcohol on site, only mash and mix the nuts, the event is appropriate (and fun) for kids too.

Follow us on Facebook? Here’s the event to RSVP and invite your friends. Follow the discussion here:
http://www.facebook.com/topic.php?uid=71899262386&topic=15380

Below are instructions and guidelines for foraging and sourcing your own green walnuts, which are abundant around Seattle. You are still welcome at the event if you cannot find any but we encourage you to try.

Vintage Nocino AdPlease reply to beth@slowfoodseattle.org to let us know you’re participating so we can accommodate everyone with interest and share foraging and Nocino making tips with you even if you cannot make the event.

A brief list of supplies and exact location will be sent to email responders before the event.

Foraging Instructions:

There are two types of edible walnuts. Black or English and Persian. Both can be found around the city. The following links provide a picture of leaves of each tree for your identification.

Green walnuts can be hard to see. I have found most trees by noticing the shells from last year’s crop on the ground. Ask around, though, and you will most likely find one.

Green walnuts are ready when you can insert a strait pin in them easily. If you find walnuts at this stage you can pick them and keep them in your refrigerator.

Be careful when picking as the walnuts and branches secrete a milky sap that will oxidize and stain your skin a deep brown. I suggest using gloves and protecting all surfaces they might come in contact with.

If you cannot find any walnuts, try the farmer’s market. They are a bit of a rare items but often if you ask farmer’s will pick them for you.

Squirrels are quite fond of green walnuts; try and beat them to it.

If you find a good tree, especially one on public land, let us know.

Black Walnut Leaves:
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/ext/senior/fruits/blackwalnut5.htm

Persian Walnut (also known as English Walnut) Leaves:
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/ext/senior/fruits/walnute5.htm

Nocino-making

Join Slow Food Seattle for “From Woods to Plate: Foraged Foods of the Pacific Northwest”

Forager and author Langdon Cook

Langdon Cook

**UPDATE: Though online ticket sales will end on Tuesday, June 15th at 1pm – you can still make it to hear Langdon’s talk and see an all new slide presentation  that night at the Montlake Community Center, 7pm. Limited tickets available at the door – come and bring your friends & family!**

Foraging is not just a throwback to our hunter-gatherer past. It’s a way to reconnect with the landscape whether rural or urban and eat healthy, delicious wild foods. Author and forager Langdon Cook will share his adventures in the field and in the kitchen with a lecture and slide presentation. Copies of his book Fat of the Land: Adventures of a 21st Century Forager will be available for purchase at the lecture.

7pm, Tuesday, June 15, 2010
Montlake Community Center
1618 East Calhoun St.
Seattle, WA 98112

Tickets: $15 Members*; $20 Non-Members

Purchase now at Brown Paper Tickets

Tickets onsale May 25

(*Slow Food Seattle members will receive a discount code for this event via email on Tuesday, May 25th – contact us if you are a current member and have not received the details.)

Follow us on Facebook? Here’s the event to RSVP and invite your friends.


Fat of the Land: Adventures of a 21st Century ForagerLangdon Cook is the author of Fat of the Land: Adventures of a 21st Century Forager. He was a senior book editor at Amazon.com before leaving the corporate world in 2004 to live in a cabin off the grid with his family. Now a freelance writer and blogger, Cook has written for Gray’s Sporting Journal, Outside, Fly Fisherman, The Stranger, Seattle Metropolitan, Northwest Palate, and numerous other publications. He has been profiled in Bon Appetit and WSJ magazine. Cook is a graduate of the University of Washington’s MFA program and a recipient of PEN Northwest’s Margery Boyden Wilderness Writing Residency. He lives in Seattle, Washington.

Join the conversation: Ben Hewitt author of “The Town That Food Saved”

The Town That Food SavedJoin Slow Food Seattle for our first foray towards an ongoing book club. We’ll be doing a combination of partnerships with Kim Ricketts Book Events and connecting with the incredible resources of our local authors. If you’d like to be involved, drop us a line or come to the event this coming Tuesday.

This is the first event in a series on food, sustainability and community called “Edible Conversations” and will take place on June 8th at 7pm at Tom Douglas’ Palace Ballroom. Jill Lightner, the editor of Edible Seattle will interview Ben Hewitt about his life as a farmer, and the way a group of farmers and entrepreneurs banded together to create a comprehensive food system and revive the dying economy of Hardwick, Vermont.

Like many rural communities in America, Hardwick, Vermont was build on a industry that had packed up and left long ago, and the town had suffered from a depressed economy for over a century. With an unemployment rate of 40% and in the middle of a crippling recession, a small group of young farmers and community leaders embarked on a quest to create a comprehensive, functional and vibrant food system, bring jobs to their region and create new ways for them to make a living off their farmlands. As Ben tells the story of his one town’s transformation, there will be lessons for all of us who believe that a healthy, local agricultural system can be the basis of community strength, economic vitality and food security.

Joining Jill and Ben will be local chefs, Sequim farmer Kia Kozun of Nash’s Organic Produce, Chris Curtis, the Director of Seattle’s Neighborhood Farmer’s Markets and Mary Embleton, Director of the Cascade Harvest Coalition.

Brown Paper Tickets

contact us for SFS supporter promo code

**Slow Food Seattle supporters receive a significant discount – contact us for the promo code or sign up for our mailing list to receive directly.**

(Tickets here; RSVP details on Facebook)

The $25/person price includes appetizers and Theo chocolate confections; a cash bar will be available as well. Copies of The Town That Food Saved will be available for purchase and signing at the event.

Ben Hewitt

Kim Ricketts Book EventsEdible Seattle