Slow Food Seattle Books: July 14 – The Unprejudiced Palate by Angelo Pellegrini

Angelo Pellegrini

Angelo Pellegrini: Slow Food, before Slow Food existed

Join us for our next book club selection on Thursday, July 14th, the classic - The Unprejudiced Palate: Classic Thoughts on Food and the Good Life by Seattle’s own Angelo Pellegrini.

Join us! This will be an active, open conversation and all are welcome – please come even if you haven’t had a chance to finish the book! We’ll be meeting from 6-7:30 p.m. on Thursday, July 14th. Roy Street Coffee and Tea is located at 700 Broadway East. Limited free parking is available in the lot below.  RSVP on Facebook too!

From the publisher:
“First issued in 1948, when soulless minute steaks and quick casseroles were becoming the norm, The Unprejudiced Palate inspired a seismic culinary shift in how America eats. Written by a food-loving immigrant from Tuscany, this memoir-cum-cookbook articulates the Italian American vision of the good life: a backyard garden, a well-cooked meal shared with family and friends, and a passion for ingredients and cooking that nourish the body and the soul.”

The Unprejudiced Palate“I have always thought that Angelo Pellegrini misnamed his charming but opinionated book. It should have been called the Prejudiced Palate, because he is so absolutely sure and unwavering in his vision of how to live a beautiful and delicious life. And I think he’s right.”
–Alice Waters, Owner, Chez Panisse

“Like great dishes, great writing remains in our memory forever. Angelo Pellegrini’s THE UNPREJUDICED PALATE is a lesson in how to enjoy life in an elegant and highly civilized way.”
– Jacques Pépin

“THE UNPREJUDICED PALATE is a forgotten gem from what might be remembered as the Golden Age of American food writing. This Italian born, beloved Seattle professor, friend and colleague of MFK Fisher, wrote with charm, wit, and a rare intelligence about food.”
–Mark Kurlansky, author of Salt, Cod, 1968

Resources:

Volunteers still needed – this Saturday, May 28th, 10am-2pm!

Join us for an afternoon of habitat restoration at Full Circle Farm led by Stewardship Partners on Saturday, May 28th on the banks of Griffin Creek and the Snoqualmie River. Do your part to save wild salmon by restoring a stretch of water essential to salmon spawning success. It is your choice whether wield a shovel or a camera. All levels of activity and support are welcome. Co-Sponsors for the work party are: Edible Seattle, Full Circle Farm, and Stewardship Partners.

Contact Alex Ko from Stewardship Partners today to RSVP at 206.292.9875.

 

The trail building is from 10am-2pm at Full Circle Farm in Carnation. Please try to arrive promptly at ten or slightly before, as the trail is about 2/3 of a mile from the parking lot, and we have a tractor taking volunteers out on the dot. Feel free to bring friends and family! There will be pastries and donuts, generously donated by Grateful Bread bakery of Seattle, and coffee provided by Starbucks.

A few things to remember:

  • It is the Pacific NW so dress in layers, bring raingear, gloves and wear sturdy shoes or boots
  • Bring your own snacks and water
  • You will be outside and ‘facilities’ may be limited
  • Come ready to work but be mindful of your own limitations. Please don’t overdo it.

Driving directions from Seattle:

  • Take 1-90E
  • Take exit 22 towards Preston/Fall City
  • Turn left at SE 82nd St
  • Turn right at SE High Point Way/Preston Fall City Rd SE
  • Continue to follow Preston Fall City Rd SE
  • Turn Right at WA-202 E/SE Redmond Fall City Rd/River St
  • At the traffic circle, take the 2nd exit onto WA-203 N/Fall City Carnation Rd SE
  • Turn left at NE 8th St
  • Drive to small white house and park in lot

Share on Facebook too: RSVP on Facebook too!

To read more about wild salmon habitat, check out the story in the May/June edition of Edible Seattle.

Next Slow Food Seattle Books Meeting: May 12

Kurt Timmermeister

Kurt Timmermeister

Join us on May 12 for the next Slow Food Seattle Books!

Our May book club selection is Kurt Timmermeister’s, Growing a Farmer: How I Learned to Live Off the Land.

“An intimate look at the life and livelihood of a modern-day farmer, as told by a former urbanite. A bona-fide city dweller, Kurt Timmermeister never intended to run his own dairy farm. When he purchased four acres of land on Vashon

Island, he was looking for an affordable home a ferry ride away from the restaurants he ran in Seattle. But as he continued to serve his customers frozen chicken breasts and packaged pork, he became aware of the connection between what he ate and where it came from: a hive of bees provided honey; a young cow could give fresh milk; an apple orchard allowed him to make vinegar.

Growing a FarmerTold in Timmermeister’s plainspoken voice, Growing a Farmer details with honesty the initial stumbles and subsequent realities he had to face in his quest to establish a profitable farm for himself. Personal yet

practical, Growing a Farmer includes the specifics of making cheese, raising cows, and slaughtering pigs, and it will recast entirely the way we think about our relationship to the food we consume.”

Join us! This will be an active, open conversation and all are welcome – please come even if you haven’t had a chance to finish the book! We’ll be meeting from 6-7:30 p.m. on Thursday, May 12. Roy Street Coffee and Tea is located at 700 Broadway East. Limited free parking is available in the lot below.

Please post questions as you’re reading for Kurt in the comments here or on our Reading Discussion on Facebook. Kurt has generously agreed to answer them for us!

RSVP to books@slowfoodseattle.org RSVP on Facebook too!

Want to pick up a copy of Growing a Farmer? Here’s a list of local booksellers, also available via our Amazon store.

Kurt Timmermeister

Next Slow Food Seattle Books Meeting: March 10

Join us for our next Slow Food Seattle Books meeting on March 10, 2011 at Roy Street Coffee and Tea on Capitol Hill!

Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild FoodOur March book club selection is Paul Greenberg’s Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food. Greenberg describes how four fish–salmon, tuna, bass, and cod–“dominate the modern seafood market.” He takes a culinary journey around the world and examines how the wild fish industry has become increasingly industrialized over the last 30 years. He also shows how we can heal the ocean and make sustainable seafood the rule rather than the exception. This book is sure to generate great passion and discussion, so join us! This will be an active, open conversation and all are welcome – please join us even if you haven’t had a chance to finish the book! We’ll be meeting from 6-7:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 10. Roy Street Coffee and Tea is located at 700 Broadway East. Limited free parking is available in the lot below.
  • Read or listen to an interview with Greenberg on NPR here
  • Check out the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch here and we can discuss your thoughts.
  • See Dan Barber’s funny and thoughtful presentation, “How I Fell In Love with a Fish,” here
  • Support wild salmon & the food, jobs, and economic benefits they provide by sending a letter to President Obama.

RSVP to books@slowfoodseattle.org RSVP on Facebook too!

Want to pick up a copy of Four Fish? Here’s a list of local booksellers, also available via our Amazon store.

Annual SFS Membership Meeting: Jan. 30

Join us for our Annual Slow Food Seattle Membership Meeting & Potluck on Sunday, January 30, 2011!

Free to all current SFS Members ~ Only $25 to join Slow Food!

We’ll share some wonderful food, introduce our current board members and the slate of new candidates, as well as take some time to chat about the different programs and areas that Slow Food Seattle is currently working on in the our community.

SFS Members – please register for this FREE event: RSVP by Saturday, January 29th via Brown Paper Tickets

Bring a dish and bring the family!

Please bring a potluck dish (any course you prefer) and a non-alcoholic beverage to share. This meeting is FREE and open to all current Slow Food Seattle members and their families.

Dishes should be ready to serve and include serving utensils. Bring your own plates, flatware and glasses, etc. We’ll provide cards for you to label your dish with its name & yours. Please note any dietary information that may be helpful to fellow members.

Share the Slow Food experience with friends and family: $25 makes you a member!

Join Slow Food USA for $25!

Event Info:

DATE: Sunday, January 30, 2011
TIME:
2:00 to 4:00 PM
LOCATION:
Montlake Community Center | 1618 E Calhoun St, Seattle, 98112
Free Parking | Directions

Questions? Contact Jennifer Johnson at info@slowfoodseattle.org or 206.423.4673.

Slow Food Seattle Albacore Canning Day with Jeremy Brown

Tuna canning guru and Washington fisherman, Jeremy Brown

Tuna canning guru and Washington fisherman, Jeremy Brown.

In the spirit of Terra Madre Day, over fifty Slow Food Seattle members and community supporters came together on November 28th for a day-long fish canning workshop called – “Time to Tin a Tuna!” – taught by Jeremy Brown, a Bellingham-based commercial fisherman and longtime proponent of Slow Food.

Wild Pacific Albacore has been in the news for all the right reasons – topping the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Super Green List and on National Public Radio in a feature on the growth of micro-canneries in the Pacific Northwest.

Though you can find canned albacore tuna at your local food co-ops or fish markets in many communities, this was an opportunity to learn firsthand with someone well-versed in the process and safety considerations of using pressure cookers. At the end of the day, attendees left with both with the pride of supporting a local fisherman and a good stock of Wild Pacific Albacore to last through the long northwest winter. In past years, Jeremy had done these canning days in the coastal town of Port Townsend, Washington with Amy Grondin, a Slow Food Seattle board member and Port Townsend resident. This was the first time collaborating directly with Slow Food Seattle.

Volunteers washed, trimmed, and cut the tuna into chunks for canning.

Volunteers washed, trimmed, and cut the tuna into chunks for canning.

We were at maximum capacity a matter of days after announcing the event. We were able to use a commercial kitchen space donated by Gourmondo, a local catering company and Jeremy arrived with everything we needed to preserve our own delicious and nutritious, locally caught albacore tuna to see us through until the 2011 albacore fishing season.

The fish was pre-cut into steaks and with the help of a rotating assembly line of volunteers – we cleaned, trimmed, chopped, packed and processed a thousand pounds of albacore in eight hours!

The recipe was an old Breton family recipe Jeremy picked up while in France many years back – simple and delicious for anyone with a pressure canner and access to some great local fish:

  • Pack tuna cut into about 2-inch chunks into jars along with a pinch of salt (we used kosher salt and 12-ounce jars).
  • The secret ingredient that adds just the right level of sweetness is a slice of carrot.
  • Add extra-virgin olive oil about half-way filling the jars, wipe the rims, cover with the lids and process.

Slow Food Seattle made the round-up on Terra Madre Day on the Slow Food USA blog!

Wild Pacific Albacore Tuna

Wild Pacific Albacore Tuna

 

June Lee (bottom left), Philip Lee (top right), Amy Grondin (top center) skinning and cleaning albacore.

June Lee (bottom left), Philip Lee (top right), Amy Grondin (top center) skinning and cleaning albacore.

Tuna in jars, ready to be processed. The "secret" ingredient is a slice of carrot for sweetness.

Tuna in jars, ready to be processed. The "secret" ingredient is a slice of carrot for sweetness.

SFS board member, Patricia Eddy and her husband, John Eddy breaking down tuna steaks.

SFS board member, Patricia Eddy and her husband, John Eddy - both of cooklocal.com - breaking down tuna steaks.

Jars of tuna, waiting their turn for the pressure cooker.

Jars of tuna, waiting their turn for the pressure cooker.

Pressure cooker, letting off some steam. Tuna jars cooling in the background.

Pressure cooker, letting off some steam. Tuna jars cooling in the background.

Photos: Jennifer Johnson