Slow Food Seattle Albacore Canning Day with Jeremy Brown

Tuna canning guru and Washington fisherman, Jeremy Brown

Tuna canning guru and Washington fisherman, Jeremy Brown.

In the spirit of Terra Madre Day, over fifty Slow Food Seattle members and community supporters came together on November 28th for a day-long fish canning workshop called – “Time to Tin a Tuna!” – taught by Jeremy Brown, a Bellingham-based commercial fisherman and longtime proponent of Slow Food.

Wild Pacific Albacore has been in the news for all the right reasons – topping the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Super Green List and on National Public Radio in a feature on the growth of micro-canneries in the Pacific Northwest.

Though you can find canned albacore tuna at your local food co-ops or fish markets in many communities, this was an opportunity to learn firsthand with someone well-versed in the process and safety considerations of using pressure cookers. At the end of the day, attendees left with both with the pride of supporting a local fisherman and a good stock of Wild Pacific Albacore to last through the long northwest winter. In past years, Jeremy had done these canning days in the coastal town of Port Townsend, Washington with Amy Grondin, a Slow Food Seattle board member and Port Townsend resident. This was the first time collaborating directly with Slow Food Seattle.

Volunteers washed, trimmed, and cut the tuna into chunks for canning.

Volunteers washed, trimmed, and cut the tuna into chunks for canning.

We were at maximum capacity a matter of days after announcing the event. We were able to use a commercial kitchen space donated by Gourmondo, a local catering company and Jeremy arrived with everything we needed to preserve our own delicious and nutritious, locally caught albacore tuna to see us through until the 2011 albacore fishing season.

The fish was pre-cut into steaks and with the help of a rotating assembly line of volunteers – we cleaned, trimmed, chopped, packed and processed a thousand pounds of albacore in eight hours!

The recipe was an old Breton family recipe Jeremy picked up while in France many years back – simple and delicious for anyone with a pressure canner and access to some great local fish:

  • Pack tuna cut into about 2-inch chunks into jars along with a pinch of salt (we used kosher salt and 12-ounce jars).
  • The secret ingredient that adds just the right level of sweetness is a slice of carrot.
  • Add extra-virgin olive oil about half-way filling the jars, wipe the rims, cover with the lids and process.

Slow Food Seattle made the round-up on Terra Madre Day on the Slow Food USA blog!

Wild Pacific Albacore Tuna

Wild Pacific Albacore Tuna

 

June Lee (bottom left), Philip Lee (top right), Amy Grondin (top center) skinning and cleaning albacore.

June Lee (bottom left), Philip Lee (top right), Amy Grondin (top center) skinning and cleaning albacore.

Tuna in jars, ready to be processed. The "secret" ingredient is a slice of carrot for sweetness.

Tuna in jars, ready to be processed. The "secret" ingredient is a slice of carrot for sweetness.

SFS board member, Patricia Eddy and her husband, John Eddy breaking down tuna steaks.

SFS board member, Patricia Eddy and her husband, John Eddy - both of cooklocal.com - breaking down tuna steaks.

Jars of tuna, waiting their turn for the pressure cooker.

Jars of tuna, waiting their turn for the pressure cooker.

Pressure cooker, letting off some steam. Tuna jars cooling in the background.

Pressure cooker, letting off some steam. Tuna jars cooling in the background.

Photos: Jennifer Johnson

Edible Holiday Gifts with Amy Pennington, Dec. 2nd

Amy Pennington

Urban Pantry author, Amy Pennington. Photo: Della Chen

Local foodie celeb and author of this year’s must-have cookbook, Urban Pantry, Amy Pennington is teaming up with Slow Food Seattle on Thursday, December 2nd from 6-8pm for a fun and festive evening of edible gift-making at Seattle’s Vineyard Table!

Amy will demonstrate a variety of the thrifty, sustainable, and seasonal recipes that have prompted praise for Urban Pantry from everyone from the Seattle Times to Sunset to Gwyneth Paltrow, focusing on edible gifts that can be prepared in any home kitchen.

Participants will each receive a signed copy of Urban Pantry and get to take home a sample treat from those created during the evening. Organically produced wine from Snoqualmie Vineyards and light snacks will also be provided.

Tickets are $25/person and include a signed copy of Urban Pantry & your edible gifts!

Gift items such as…

  • Herbal Salt Rubs
  • Scented Sugars
  • Herbal Digestifs & Cordials
  • Pickled Fennel
  • PLUS: Creative DIY Labeling for your gifts!
Brown Paper Tickets

Limited tickets available now!

 

 

 

The details:

Edible Holiday Gifts with Amy Pennington
6-8pm, Thursday, December 2, 2010

The Vineyard Table
85 South Atlantic St.
Seattle, WA 98134

Urban Pantry by Amy Pennington

SFS at the Pike Place Market Artisan Food Festival

Eric Boutin & Hsiao-Ching Chou

Eric Boutin, Nutrition Director of Seattle Public Schools & Hsiao-Ching Chou of Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution Seattle talking good food in schools.

Philip & June Lee of Readers to Eaters, joined the Slow Food Seattle booth at the Pike Place Market Artisan Food Festival.

Philip (& June, not pictured) Lee of Readers to Eaters, joined the Slow Food Seattle booth at the Pike Place Market Artisan Food Festival.

Amy Pennington signing copies of her book, "Urban Pantry"

Amy Pennington signing copies of her book, "Urban Pantry"

Amy Pennington chatting with fans & signing copies of her book, "Urban Pantry"

Amy Pennington chatting with fans & signing copies of her book, "Urban Pantry"

Jon Rowley demonstrating how to use a refractometer to gauge the level of sugars in tomatoes.

Jon Rowley demonstrating how to use a refractometer to gauge the level of sugars in tomatoes.

Checking the refractometer at Jon Rowley's Brix demo

Checking the refractometer level of tomatoes at Jon Rowley's Brix demo.

Some gorgeous heirloom tomatoes fresh from the U-Distric Farmers Market - testing their Brix levels as part of Jon Rowley's quest for the 10-Brix tomato.

Some gorgeous heirloom tomatoes fresh from the U-Distric Farmers Market - testing their Brix levels as part of Jon Rowley's quest for the 10-Brix tomato.

Kathleen Flinn, author of "the Sharper Your Knife the Less You Cry," talking about how to choose a knife that's right for you.

Kathleen Flinn, author of "the Sharper Your Knife the Less You Cry," talking about how to choose a knife that's right for you.

Kathleen Flinn, author of "the Sharper Your Knife the Less You Cry," showing the group basic knife skills.

Kathleen Flinn, author of "the Sharper Your Knife the Less You Cry," showing the group basic knife skills.

June Lee (left) tries her hand at cutting an onion like a chef after Kathleen Flinn's (right) demonstration.

June Lee (left) tries her hand at cutting an onion like a chef after Kathleen Flinn's (right) demonstration.

Anthony Warner and Tiana Colovos came out to talk about the Orca K-8 School Garden

Anthony Warner and Tiana Colovos came out to talk about the Orca K-8 School Garden

Thanks to all of you who came out this weekend to listen to our speakers, watch the demos, pick up some books from our partners Readers to Eaters, who volunteered as part of the national Slow Food Dig In! day, and chatted with us about Slow Food. All of this was in support for the Pike Place Market Foundation’s Human Service Programs.

All images : Jennifer Johnson

Line-up for this weekend’s Artisan Food Festival

We’ve got the schedule confirmed for the Slow Food Seattle booth (look for us near the Chef Demo stage) at the Pike Place Market Artisan Food Festival coming up this weekend on Saturday, Sept. 25 and Sunday, Sept. 26.

Readers to EatersOur friends at Readers to Eaters will be joining us with books and speakers on both days. Readers to Eaters promotes food literacy through community food events, education programs, book publishing, and a mobile bookstore.

Saturday, Sept. 25

Sunday, Sept. 26
Come by and learn more about what we do at Slow Food Seattle, our upcoming events, and how to get involved in the Slow Food movement.

Need a map of the festival? Right-click on the Adobe logo to download. Adobe Acrobat PDFLook for us near the Chef Demo stage.

The last quarter of the 20th Century has seen a craft food renaissance world wide. Slow Food, the powerful consumer movement founded in Italy as a counter to fast food, is said to be the biggest consumer based food movement in history. The U.S.-the country that invented the supermarket-now boasts almost 5,000 farmers markets. At the heart of it all is the famous Pike Place Market. On September 25th and 26th, Seattle will celebrate artisan food in the heart of our country’s oldest public market and a leading food trendsetter.

Pike Place Market FoundationThe Pike Place Market Artisan Food Festival is produced by The Market Foundation and is a benefit for the Pike Place Market’s human service agencies: Pike Market Medical Clinic, Child Care & Preschool, Senior Center and the Downtown Food Bank. More info can be found at www.artisanfoodfestival.org.

A summer update

We’re deep in the throes of summertime picnics, road-trips, time on the water, gardening, canning, and easy days with friends and family! Below are some great events and opportunities on the horizon – join us!

Pike Place Market Artisan Food Festival
Pike Place Market Artisan Food Festival10am – 6pm, Saturday, Sept. 25
10am – 5pm, Sunday, Sept. 26

The last quarter of the 20th Century has seen a craft food renaissance world wide. Slow Food, the powerful consumer movement founded in Italy as a counter to fast food, is said to be the biggest consumer based food movement in history. The U.S.-the country that invented the supermarket-now boasts almost 5,000 farmers markets. At the heart of it all is the famous Pike Place Market. On September 25th and 26th, Seattle will celebrate artisan food in the heart of our country’s oldest public market and a leading food trendsetter.

Slow Food Seattle will be there with some special guests for Q&A’s, book signings, and more! Join the celebration!

The Pike Place Market Artisan Food Festival is produced by The Market Foundation and is a benefit for the Pike Place Market’s human service agencies: Pike Market Medical Clinic, Child Care & Preschool, Senior Center and the Downtown Food Bank. More info can be found at www.artisanfoodfestival.org.

Dig In! Slow Food National Volunteer Day
Volunteers needed!

Slow Food Seattle is working with the Slow Food chapters locally and across the nation, to reach out to our communities and get some work done. This year we’ll be volunteering as part of the Pike Place Market Artisan Food Festival on September 25th and 26th (see next story for more on the festival). All proceeds from the festival benefit the programs of the Pike Place Market Foundation. Recruit your friends and family and enjoy the day together. Make a difference and have some fun!

Roles include helping with festival load-in, set-up, tear down, staffing the “Zucchini 500″ kids activity, and helping vendors as needed.

The first 50 people to register to volunteer will receive one of our spiffy new Slow Food Seattle aprons!

Contact Erika Sweet at the Pike Place Market Foundation to register and be sure to identify yourself as a Slow Food Seattle volunteer (to qualify for an apron)! erika.sweet@pikeplacemarket.org or 206.774.5254.

Seattle Chefs Collaborative
Urban Picnic 2010
Sunday, September 12, 2010

Eat it to save it!

Join Seattle Chefs Collaborative for a Sunday afternoon of fun and fantastic food on the rooftop deck at Rainier Square and help send local rising culinary stars to the Quillisascut Farm school in Rice, WA. Celebrated Seattle chefs will prepare another picnic to remember of culturally important Northwest foods from the Seattle Chefs Collaborative Urban Picnic 2010Renewing Americas Food Traditions (RAFT) list of endangered foods. As we like to say, ya gotta eat it to save it.

Participating chefs & restaurants include: John Sundstrom of Lark, Jason Franey of Canlis, Maria Hines of Tilth, Seth Caswell of emmer&rye, Ethan Stowell of Anchovies & Olives, Rachel Yang of Joule, Dan Braun of Oliver’s Twist, Karen Jurgensen of Quillisascut Farm, Riley Starks of Willows inn, Autumn Martin of Hot Cakes, and Tara Ayers of Ocho, one of the recipients of the 2010 Quillisascut scholarship.

Tickets $60 at Brown Paper Tickets
Children under 10 are free
www.brownpapertickets.com/event/121012

Urban Picnic is presented in partnership with Slow Food Seattle and Seattle CityClub. More info at Seattle Chefs Collaborative.

American Terroir: Savoring the Flavors of Our Woods, Waters and FieldsAn Edible Conversation with Rowan Jacobsen
author of American Terroir: Savoring the Flavors of Our Woods, Waters and Fields

September 21, 2010
7pm, The Palace Ballroom

2030 5th Ave. Seattle

Slow Food Seattle supporter discount – $10 off general admission
Promo code: slowterroir

James Beard award winning food writer Rowan Jacobsen discusses the role of the place in the taste of food in his new book American Terroir. He will be joined by Jill Lightner of Edible Seattle, Sharon Campbell of Tieton Cider Works and Harmony Orchard, Jon Rowley of Taylor Shellfish Farms and Greg Atkinson, author of The Northwest Essentials Cookbooks to discuss why delicious food is all about location, location, location. $25 ticket price includes panel discussion, appetizers, Theo chocolate and guided tasting of NW cider, apples and oysters.

Tickets $15/$25 at Brown Paper Tickets. Includes panel discussion, appetizers, Theo chocolate and guided tasting of NW cider, apples and oysters.

Use the promo code “slowterroir” to receive the $10 discount. More info can be found at www.kimricketts.com.

Kim Ricketts Book Events Edible Seattle Slow Food Seattle

Eat Wild Salmon and Savor Bristol Bay

Seattle Restaurants and Markets Help Trout Unlimited Alaska to Protect Bristol Bay Salmon from Mine Threat

Save Bristol Bay, Salmon Factory of the World

Freshly caught wild salmon, direct from the pristine waters of Bristol Bay, Alaska, will arrive in restaurants and seafood cases in Portland and Seattle early next month as part of Trout Unlimited Alaska’s Savor Bristol Bay campaign.

By participating in Savor Bristol Bay week, businesses and consumers are supporting Trout Unlimited Alaska’s grassroots Save Bristol Bay campaign.

Savor Bristol Bay

Bristol Bay is not only rich with wild salmon, but it’s also where developers want to build a massive, open-pit copper and gold mine called Pebble in the headwaters of some of the most productive fish habitat left on the planet. The proposed mine threatens to pollute the waters of Bristol Bay and harm

what is the world’s largest sockeye salmon run. Trout Unlimited Alaska is working with a diverse coalition of food community members, Alaska Native leaders, commercial and sport fishermen and many others to gain permanent protection for Bristol Bay.

During the week of July 4 to 10, Slow Food Seattle supporters are encouraged to support Bristol Bay salmon by Voting with Their Forks at participating businesses. They can also purchase salmon from Seattle’s PCC Natural Markets and Seattle Fish Company.

Seattle’s Restaurants and Markets supporting Savor Bristol Bay week:

Chef Becky  Selengut (photo: Valentina Vitols)

Chef Becky Selengut (photo: Valentina Vitols)

If you are looking for a hands on approach to satisfying your seafood cravings, join Chef Becky Selengut at the Edmonds PCC on Wednesday, July 7th for her Bristol Bay Salmon Cooking class. Class menu includes: Quinoa cakes with wok-smoked king salmon and herbs; Bristol Bay salmon with watercress soup, chile oil and croutons; Slow cooked sockeye salmon with Columbia Valley red wine sauce and braised fennel. For details and to sign up for the class visit: www.brownpapertickets.com/event/112619

Red GoldWant to see the beauty of Bristol Bay for yourself but don’t have a float plane? Free screenings of the award-winning Bristol Bay documentary, Red Gold, will be held throughout the week. In Seattle, Roy Street Coffee & Tea will screen Red Gold at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, July 6 and at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, July 8. Watch the film while nibbling on salmon snacks prepared by Seattle Chefs!

“We’re pleased to be a part of Savor Bristol Bay week. With West Coast wild salmon fisheries struggling the last few years, we want to do what we can to keep Bristol Bay sockeye plentiful and healthy so that we can keep offering sustainable wild salmon to our guests,” said Chef Kevin Davis, owner of Seattle-based Steelhead Diner and Blueacre Seafood.

Learn more about Savor Bristol Bay week and what you can do to get involved at www.savebristolbay.org

Trout UnlimitedFor more information contact:
Amy Grondin
ajgrondin@gmail.com
206.295.4931