Walnuts to Liqueur: Making Nocino with Chef Beth Maxey

Green Walnuts**This event has been rescheduled to July 31st, from 12:00-1:30**

Nocino is a traditional Italian liqueur made with green walnuts, spices and alcohol. It has a rich earthy flavor and is delicious as a digestive, over ice cream and as a reduction over duck breast…

Join Slow Food Seattle board member Chef Beth Maxey from 12:00 pm -1:30 pm on Saturday July 31st for a free hands-on Nocino making event in Volunteer Park and in an online community in the upcoming weeks as we share tips and forage for green walnuts (which are plentiful around the city).

Nocino making traditionally takes place during and after the festival of St. John the Baptist, where families and communities gather to feast and celebrate. Though we’re not celebrating a religious event, we’d love to preserve the conviviality of a community gathering. I’ll share my recipe from Italy as well as discuss regional variations and some of the technicalities of extractions. We’ll mix and mash nuts and flavorings and plan a follow-up tasting to see who really got it right. Also, since we will not add alcohol on site, only mash and mix the nuts, the event is appropriate (and fun) for kids too.

Follow us on Facebook? Here’s the event to RSVP and invite your friends. Follow the discussion here:
http://www.facebook.com/topic.php?uid=71899262386&topic=15380

Below are instructions and guidelines for foraging and sourcing your own green walnuts, which are abundant around Seattle. You are still welcome at the event if you cannot find any but we encourage you to try.

Vintage Nocino AdPlease reply to beth@slowfoodseattle.org to let us know you’re participating so we can accommodate everyone with interest and share foraging and Nocino making tips with you even if you cannot make the event.

A brief list of supplies and exact location will be sent to email responders before the event.

Foraging Instructions:

There are two types of edible walnuts. Black or English and Persian. Both can be found around the city. The following links provide a picture of leaves of each tree for your identification.

Green walnuts can be hard to see. I have found most trees by noticing the shells from last year’s crop on the ground. Ask around, though, and you will most likely find one.

Green walnuts are ready when you can insert a strait pin in them easily. If you find walnuts at this stage you can pick them and keep them in your refrigerator.

Be careful when picking as the walnuts and branches secrete a milky sap that will oxidize and stain your skin a deep brown. I suggest using gloves and protecting all surfaces they might come in contact with.

If you cannot find any walnuts, try the farmer’s market. They are a bit of a rare items but often if you ask farmer’s will pick them for you.

Squirrels are quite fond of green walnuts; try and beat them to it.

If you find a good tree, especially one on public land, let us know.

Black Walnut Leaves:
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/ext/senior/fruits/blackwalnut5.htm

Persian Walnut (also known as English Walnut) Leaves:
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/ext/senior/fruits/walnute5.htm

Nocino-making

Join Slow Food Seattle for “From Woods to Plate: Foraged Foods of the Pacific Northwest”

Forager and author Langdon Cook

Langdon Cook

**UPDATE: Though online ticket sales will end on Tuesday, June 15th at 1pm – you can still make it to hear Langdon’s talk and see an all new slide presentation  that night at the Montlake Community Center, 7pm. Limited tickets available at the door – come and bring your friends & family!**

Foraging is not just a throwback to our hunter-gatherer past. It’s a way to reconnect with the landscape whether rural or urban and eat healthy, delicious wild foods. Author and forager Langdon Cook will share his adventures in the field and in the kitchen with a lecture and slide presentation. Copies of his book Fat of the Land: Adventures of a 21st Century Forager will be available for purchase at the lecture.

7pm, Tuesday, June 15, 2010
Montlake Community Center
1618 East Calhoun St.
Seattle, WA 98112

Tickets: $15 Members*; $20 Non-Members

Purchase now at Brown Paper Tickets

Tickets onsale May 25

(*Slow Food Seattle members will receive a discount code for this event via email on Tuesday, May 25th – contact us if you are a current member and have not received the details.)

Follow us on Facebook? Here’s the event to RSVP and invite your friends.


Fat of the Land: Adventures of a 21st Century ForagerLangdon Cook is the author of Fat of the Land: Adventures of a 21st Century Forager. He was a senior book editor at Amazon.com before leaving the corporate world in 2004 to live in a cabin off the grid with his family. Now a freelance writer and blogger, Cook has written for Gray’s Sporting Journal, Outside, Fly Fisherman, The Stranger, Seattle Metropolitan, Northwest Palate, and numerous other publications. He has been profiled in Bon Appetit and WSJ magazine. Cook is a graduate of the University of Washington’s MFA program and a recipient of PEN Northwest’s Margery Boyden Wilderness Writing Residency. He lives in Seattle, Washington.

Hey Spring, we’ll see you at the local farmers market!

Seattle Farmers Market

2010 Farmers Market Season

Ballard Farmers Market Follow on TwitterFind on Facebook
Sundays, 10am-3pm, year-round
Located in the historic street of Ballard Ave NW, just south of NW Market St.
East of 22nd Ave NW, this market has a style reminiscent of the street markets of Europe. Featuring only Washington State seasonal farmers’, fishers’ and ranchers’ produce, including cheeses, eggs, chicken, tree fruits, berries, ciders and wines, honey, local artisan’s handcrafted quality items, a variety of wild-caught seafood and shellfish, products from area food processors and bakers, and wildcrafted items such as mushrooms and wild greens.

Broadway Farmers Market Follow on TwitterFind on Facebook
Sundays, 11am-3pm, May 9 to December 19
Located in the parking lot behind BofA, at Broadway & E. Thomas, 98102
Operating since 2005, this popular Farmers Market offers Capitol Hill residents a wonderful variety of all-local, all-seasonal fresh farm produce, as well as delicious cheeses, baked goods, honey, eggs, meats and cut flower bouquets.  Cooking demos and other special events throughout the season.

Cascade Farmers Market Follow on TwitterFind on Facebook
Thursdays, 3-7pm, dates TBD
Located across the street from Cascade Playground in the South Lake Union neighborhood.

Columbia City Farmers Market Follow on TwitterFind on Facebook
Wednesdays, 3-7pm, April 28 to October 20
Located at Rainier Ave S and S Edmunds, 98118
Operating since 1998. The market features a cornucopia of fresh fruits and vegetables from local farms, as well as organic eggs, meats, cheeses, baked goods, ciders, preserves, honey and more. Cooking demos, live music and special events for kids throughout the season.

Farmers Market at Fremont Sunday Market Find on Facebook
Sundays, 10am to 4pm, year-round (except Fremont Fair Sun. & the Sun. after Christmas)
Located at the east end of the Fremont Sunday Market on N. 34th Street, in front of the Red Door Ale House.

Lake City Farmers Market Follow on TwitterFind on Facebook
Thursdays, 3-7pm, June 3 to October 7
Located next to the Library at Albert Davis Park, NE 125th & 28th Ave NE, 98125
Operating since 2002, the Lake City Farmers Market is located next to a lovely park offering public seating, a grassy picnic area, shady trees, plus plenty of room for over 25 farmers and food vendors.  Look for delicious seasonal fruits, berries and vegetables, eggs, baked goods, meats, ciders, honey, preserves and more throughout the season, plus pumpkins, apples, heirloom potatoes and other goodies in the fall.

Madrona Farmers Market
Fridays, 3-7 pm, May 14 to September 24
Located in the parking lot of the Madrona Grocery Outlet at the corner of Martin Luther King, Jr. Way & E. Union St.

Magnolia Farmers Market Follow on TwitterFind on Facebook
Saturdays, 10am-2pm, June 5 to September 25
Located at the parking lot of the Magnolia Community Center, 2550 34th W, 98199
Over 30 family farmers and small food vendors make this Saturday farmers market a delightful weekly destination. You’ll find a wide variety of fresh, local and seasonal produce including heirloom lettuces, berries, tree fruits, vegetables, corn, tomatoes, squash, plus farm-fresh eggs, cheeses, meats, honey, preserves, fresh pasta, baked goods, cut flowers and plant starts. Cooking demos by master chefs, live music and special events for kids are also part of the market activities throughout the season. Operating since 2003.

Meadowbrook Farmers Market
Sundays, 11am-3pm, June 6 to October 31 (Closed November – May)
Located on the campus of the Seattle Waldorf School, 2728 NE 100th St., 98125.
The Meadowbrook Farmers Market is a non-profit organization dedicated to cultivating a sustainable and healthy community by offering high-quality local organic and bio-dynamic foods, artisan goods, and educational opportunities. The market will serve as an integrative model for youth and school involvement while providing support for the local economy and community development.

Phinney Farmers Market Follow on TwitterFind on Facebook
Fridays, 3-7pm, May 28 to October 1
Located in the lower parking lot of Phinney Neighborhood Center at 67th & Phinney Ave N, 98103
Over 25 farmers and food vendors bring their fresh-picked fruits, berries, vegetables, cut flowers, as well as farm-fresh eggs, cheeses, ciders, baked goods, meats, honey and more. This is a popular destination on Friday afternoons, and the market also offers some great ready-to-eat foods. Live music is scheduled throughout the season. Operating since 2007.

Queen Anne Farmers Market Follow on TwitterFind on Facebook
Thursdays, 3-7pm, May 20 to October 7
Located at W. Crockett St. at Queen Anne Ave. N, 98109
The Queen Anne Farmers Market is committed to supporting small farms, helping preserve farmland, and building a vibrant, healthy community through direct sales of local food. As Seattle’s only independent market, we offer a unique and exciting mix of fresh vegetables and fruits, cheeses, meats, breads, wine, flowers, gourmet items, and hot food, all direct from local producers. Get to know your farmer! Our event schedule is hopping with weekly chef demos, author events, workshops, and live music. Surrounded by brick buildings and shade trees, our “town square” is dog-friendly and offers exciting dining options. There is ample parking available and an ATM.

University District Farmers Market Follow on TwitterFind on Facebook
Saturdays, 9am-2pm, year-round
Located at 5031 University Way NE (50th & University Way) in the U-Heights parking lot, 98105.
Operating since 1993, and nationally recognized as one of the best farmers markets in the US (voted and/or written up in Sunset and other national and local media). Seattle’s largest “farmers-only” market. Enjoy an astounding selection of local, seasonal fruits and vegetables, berries, fresh herbs, eggs, cheeses, meats, poultry, seafood, artisan breads, ciders, preserves, honey, cut flowers and more from Washington farms and family businesses.

Wallingford Farmers Market
Wednesdays, 3-7 pm, May 19 to September 29
Located in the parking lot of the Wallingford Center at the corner of Wallingford Ave. N. & N. 45th Street.

West Seattle Farmers Market
Follow on TwitterFind on Facebook
Sundays, 10am-2pm, year-round
Located at California Ave SW & SW Alaska, in the West Seattle Junction, 98116
Operating since 1999, with fresh foods from over 35 local growers and small family businesses, including a wide selection of fresh organic and traditional fruits, berries, and vegetables, starter plants, fresh cut flowers, herbs, fish, and organic meats. Also look for fresh baked goods, honey, eggs, nuts, fresh pasta.

Oyster Bill at the Ballard Sunday Market

"Oyster Bill" Whitbeck - photo courtesy of the Ballard Sunday Market


Are you a Seattle Farmers Market that should be listed here? Drop us a line.

Terra Madre 2010: Apply by May 15th

Terra MadreEvery two years, Slow Food International hosts Terra Madre – a unique conference, in Torino, Italy. This year, Terra Madre will be held October 21 – 25, 2010. It is an international forum that gathers sustainable food producers, farmers, cooks, educators and activists from around the world to share their stories and traditions, as well as their innovative solutions for keeping small-scale agriculture and sustainable food production alive and well. The delegate application period is now open, and all of the application information is below.

The Slow Food Seattle community has an abundance of eligible and qualified people in each of the categories: sustainable food producers, farmers, cooks, educators, and activists. The activist category is new this year, and encourages a wide variety of committed people to apply. Slow Food USA wants to select a delegation with a diverse set of interests and experience. Note the section below outlining what they term “food communities” who might apply as a complete unit.

Terra Madre - Torino, ItalySlow Food Seattle sent two delegates in 2008: graduate student and now Slow Food Seattle board member, Arwen Kimmel and board member and seafood/fishing advocate, Amy Grondin. Our chapter raised money to help Arwen offset her airfare, and they both returned to share this tremendous experience with our members.

Terra Madre was a once in a lifetime experience for me personally and professionally. As a graduate student I made invaluable contacts and collected in both the Earth Workshops and from Presidia Vendors that have helped to frame my dissertation work in chocolate and coffee. Personally I made friends I think I will have forever, ate food that was life-changing and gained an even greater appreciation for Slow Food and its goals.

- Arwen Kimmel

Delegates are chosen from all over the world. Slow Food International provides accommodations, meals, and local transportation. Observers, who must also apply, may attend any conference event, but must provide their own accommodations, food, and local transportation.

Good. Clean. and Fair.

The Salone del Gusto – the world’s largest artisan food marketplace – is held concurrently, in part for delegates to gain a deeper sense of how small-scale sustainable producers can market their products effectively.

We urge anyone motivated to join the world community in finding ways to make the food system better to consider applying. If you have any questions about Terra Madre, or the application process, please send them to terramadre@slowfoodusa.org or info@slowfoodseattle.org.

Details from Slow Food USA:

What is Terra Madre?
This is the fourth edition of the conference, held biennially in Torino. It was started for small-scale sustainable food producers from across the world – currently 150 countries – to talk about sustainable production and inspire each other and share best practices.  It now brings together people from all the links in the chain – farmers, educators, cooks, activists, students.
This year, the conference will be smaller by 25% across the board (not just the US delegation). Even with the size reduction, it is still a very large conference, with thousands of people in attendance.

What it means to be a delegate:
Paid conference attendance, housing and food and ground transport in Italy (paid by Slow Food International). Delegates are responsible for US ground transport and round-trip airfare to/from Italy.

What we’re looking for:
Food producers, educators, activists, cooks, students – people who will bring diverse experiences to share and who want to bring their experience back home.  In particular: people who have never been before.

Bringing Terra Madre home:
We know some of you have expressed disappointment when delegates have attended but not connected with their Slow Food community back home. We’re always looking for ideas on how to help those connections happen. For example, if you are helping to fund someone go to Terra Madre, it is reasonable to ask them to come back and give a talk to your chapter.

To download Arwen Kimmel’s PPT presentation that she shared after returning from Terra Madre 2008, click here. (PDF – 28MB)

New people:
We are eager to bring new people to the event so the maximum number of people have a chance to experience what Terra Madre has to offer.

How to apply:
To be considered, applicants must be at least 18 years of age, and a food producer (e.g., farmers, fisher-people, wild food gatherers, etc.), cook, educator, student or activist.

You must complete and submit both parts of the application by May 15th (postmark date for the mailed portion). We will let you know the results of the application process by June 15th, 2010. We will contact you when we have received both parts of the application.

U.S. delegates pay for their own air travel to and from Italy, and ground travel in the U.S. Acceptance as a delegate includes conference attendance, in-country travel and meals, and housing for the duration of the event (an approximate value of $1,500). Please note that delegate housing is available only for delegates, and not for spouses or family members.

We encourage you to apply in a group as a food community:

  1. Geographic community: e.g. several different types of food producers who sell at the same farmers market could apply as the Ann Arbor Farmers Market food community; a chef and some of the food producers who supply to her restaurant could apply together as the Raleigh Growers and Chefs.
  2. Shared Production community: e.g. Gravenstein Apple Growers or American Raw Milk Cheese producers.

Representing yourself/selves as a food community is a wonderful way to demonstrate the ways in which different links in a production chain work together.

Application, Part 1:
Part one of the application is here: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/NJBRQ86 It should take no more than ten minutes to complete. If you are unable to fill this out online, please contact the Slow Food USA office at terramadre@slowfoodusa.org.

Application, Part 2:
Once you have completed part one, you can use part two of the application to be creative, and share your work. Please send in part two via regular mail:

c/o Terra Madre Coordinator
Slow Food USA
20 Jay St, Suite M04
Brooklyn, NY 11201

Please answer all of the below questions that are applicable. Feel free to cut and paste language from a current source, such as your farm/restaurant/program website. Creativity is encouraged!

There is a minimum word count of 400 words (no maximum). The more you tell us, the more information we will have to make our decision.

Food producer: please describe your farm, facility, etc. Describe the guiding philosophy; growing practices; certification; labor practices, and anything else you think is important for us to know.

Cook: please describe the role you play at your establishment. Please describe your food philosophy, sourcing practices, how you work with (or would like to work with) producers, and anything else you would like us to know.

Educator: please describe the program you lead or work for. What is its guiding philosophy, structure, pedagogy?

Activist: please describe your organization or project, your role there, and your goals (both organizational and personal).

For all applicants:

  1. Include pictures of you, your farm, your restaurant, your school garden, your project, your food festival.
  2. Feel free to include testimonials from your students, employees, customers, etc.
  3. Please let us know if you are connected to the local Slow Food chapter in your community. If so, which one? How?
  4. Why do you want to come to Terra Madre?
  5. How do you intend to “bring Terra Madre home” to your community?

For more information, check out the U.S. Terra Madre Network portion of our web site.

Terra Madre

This week is Savor Bristol Bay Salmon Week in Seattle: Grab your fork and Vote!

Slow Food Seattle has partnered with Trout Unlimited to kick off Savor Bristol Bay Salmon Week in Seattle from November 15 -21. It is time to ‘Vote with Your Fork to Save Bristol Bay’ and the historic runs of sockeye salmon that have returned there for over 6000 years. One of our nation’s last great wild salmon fisheries is up in Bristol Bay, Alaska.  It is your support and the power you wield in the seafood marketplace that will help us to ensure that our largest wild salmon fishery doesn’t become one of the largest open-pit mines in the world.

If developed, the proposed Pebble Mine would be one of the world’s largest open-pit mines, located in the headwaters of Bristol Bay’s most productive salmon rivers. This massive open-pit mine would alter, if not destroy, the region’s pristine spawning habitat and generate billions of tons of waste containing metals toxic to fish. The mine not only threatens the world’s largest sockeye salmon fishery but also the livelihoods of thousands of fishermen, many of whom live in the Pacific Northwest. And it’s not just humans that rely on the annual return of wild salmon. Wild salmon are at the very middle of the food chain of Bristol Bay, feeding bears, whales, sea birds, sea lions and marine mammals of all types.

Every time you buy and eat wild salmon you are helping to protect the future of these fish. Your choice to eat wild salmon states that as a consumer you value and want wild salmon swimming in the ocean and served on your dinner plate. Your purchase not only feeds your family with highly nutritious fish, it supports the families that have for generations relied on commercial fishing for their livelihood. The dollars you spend create an economic incentive for fisheries managers and government agencies to continue to find a sustainable balance that keeps a wild salmon delicious, sustainable, renewable natural resource.

Here is a list of restaurants serving Bristol Bay Sockeye:

For more details on Savor Bristol Bay Salmon Week please follow the link below:
www.savebristolbay.org/red-gold-documentary/wild-salmon-week

Read about Bristol Bay salmon in today’s news:
www.thenewstribune.com/news/local/story/955385.html?story_link=email_msg
seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2010275781_apuswildalaskasalmon1stldwritethru.html

Vote With Your Fork!

Bringing Terra Madre Home, Part II- Event tickets on sale now!

On Thursday, November 5th, Slow Food Seattle and FareStart will be hosting a special dinner to raise scholarship funds for the 2010 Slow Food Youth Workshop at the Quillisascut Farm School for the Domestic Art in Rice, Washington.

Guest Chef Karen Jurgensen of the Quillisascut Farm will prepare a three course meal of seasonally available ingredients with wine pairings to bring the taste of the Farm to the dinner guests in Seattle at FareStart. Featured will be the traditional farmstead goat cheeses from the Quillisascut Farm.

A slide show and presentation on the 2009 Slow Food Youth Workshop at the Quillisascut Farm will be presented by Danny Barksdale, Adriana Rose Taylor-Stanley and Amy Grondin.

What: The Slow Food Seattle Quillisascut Farm Student Scholarship Fundraiser

Where: FareStart, 7th & Virginia (downtown Seattle)

When: Thursday, November 5th, 6pm

Cost: $50 per member (plus tax and gratuity) $60 non-members

Purchase tickets today!

http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/86237

Slow Food Youth Workshop at Quillisascut Farm School of the Domestic Arts, August 6-12, 2009

By Amy Grondin

Nina in the garden

Nina in the garden

I was fortunate to have been invited by Lora Lea Misterly to assist her in leading the first Slow Food Youth Workshop at the Quillisascut Farm in the second week of August. Lora Lea and I met each other for the first time in October of 2008 at Terra Madre. Terra Madre is Slow Food International’s biennial meeting that brings together international food communities, cooks, academics and youth delegates for four days to work towards increasing small-scale, traditional, and sustainable food production. In Turino, Italy during the fourth week of October, the third edition of Terra Madre hosted representatives from over 150 countries. The guests together were human links in the food chain, supporting sustainable agriculture, fishing, and breeding with the goal of preserving taste and biodiversity. Once back home in Washington, Lora Lea’s idea to host the week long Slow Food Youth Workshop at the Quillisascut Farm was her way of sharing our experience at Terra Madre with young people who are interested in small scale and sustainable food systems. On the farm 13 youth had a chance to experience life on a working farm. While those attending were all considered youth, between the ages of 18 and 29, they were from varied backgrounds, communities and levels of education. The commonality that brought them all together was a passion for food, a desire to learn about how we produce what we eat and a willingness to open themselves to a completely new vision of what it meant to be part of a food community.

Group photo

Group photo


For most people, food is what they purchase mindlessly from the counters of a grocery store, neatly wrapped, packaged and portioned. Little or no thought goes into where the food is from and how it came to be available to go home in the trunks of cars and find its way to dinner tables. The week on the Quillisascut Farm gave each student a chance to experience milking goats and then creating cheese from the milk in the buckets that were carried from the barn. Vegetables tended in garden were harvested in the morning, washed and chopped in the afternoon to be cooked lovingly for dinner that evening. On goes the list of food that was produced on the farm and prepared with all our hands to nourish us that week – eggs, chickens, apricots, honey, goat – all products of earth and hard work that rewarded each of us with full stomachs and the knowledge of how our meal made its way to the table.

This knowledge also reminded us of our role as members of a food community. We were reminded that as consumers we are not removed from but active participants in our food community. The more educated we are on where and how our food is produced, the more we can support all in our food community – the farmers, harvester, distributors, grocers and other consumers. By making informed purchases we can help to keep the greater communities we live in economically strong and environmentally healthy.

Learning on the farm

Learning on the farm

Each day on the farm offered not only education from working with our hands but also from daily discussions based on powerful words: sustainability, respect, biodiversity, community, grateful and enough. The hour long talks around the 15′ long common table in the Quillisascut Farm’s kitchen invited all to reflect and share how these words are used in our culture and how the meanings of these words could guide us as we develop our own value systems that will lead us through our lives. Each day brought the students greater trust in each other through the shared tasks of farm work. That trust was revealed daily as the students shared more freely of their thoughts during the morning meetings. By the end of the week the 13 strangers who had arrived on the farm had become a community of diverse individuals bound together through shared experiences. They understood that while community is often a place based thing, a community could also be formed by individuals who share common goals, work or ideals.

In an effort to continue to share the lessons learned on the Quillisascut Farm, plans are in the works for the students to make presentations for their local Slow Food chapters based on their experiences from the week. Local Slow Food chapters sponsored half of the tuitions for the students to attend. Reporting back to the local chapters will encourage more sponsorship for future Slow Food youth groups to travel to the Quillisascut Farm.

One such presentation will be led by Danny Barksdsale, a Seattle based chef/instructor at FareStart, and Adriana Rose Taylor-Stanley, a University of Washington student and member of the UW Farms Program. Both individuals were sponsored by Slow Food Seattle to attend the Slow Food Youth Workshop on the Quillisascut Farm. Their presentation will be part of the November dinner prepared by Chef Karen Jurgensen at the FareStart facility in Seattle. The dinner will be held to raise scholarship funds for the 2010 Slow Food Youth workshop. With slide show to offer images of farm life, Danny and Ariana will tell of their shared week on the farm and do their part to add two more youth’s names to the growing community of attendees to the Quillisascut Farm School for Domestic Arts. Additionally, Danny has proposed that he and I work on planning day trips to farms in the Seattle area for the students he teaches at FareStart. FareStart is a nonprofit that helps homeless and disadvantaged individuals achieve self-sufficiency through life skills, job training and employment in the food service industry. Danny wants to somehow share his Quillisascut experience with his Seattle students who most likely have never seen a farm.

Danny surrounded by abundance

Danny surrounded by abundance


I could go on for many more pages about the powerful time that was shared with the students who formed the first group attending the Slow Food Youth Workshop this past August at the Quillisascut Farm. Much more could be said about the beauty of the land and generosity of

Lora Lea and Rick Misterly in opening their home to strangers and for giving us a glance at what they have learned from 30 years of farming. But the best thing would be for Slow Food members to join Danny, Ariana and me at FareStart on November 5th for dinner and conversation about our week on the Quillisascut Farm in Rice, Washington. We invite you to have dinner with us and learn more about the lessons learned on the farm that will help us support and form our own communities, from place based to food based and all in between.

Here are some links for Happy studentsfurther reading:

Terra Madre: http://www.terramadre.info

Quillisascut Farm: http://quillisascut.com

FareStart: http://farestart.org

UW Urban Farm: http://students.washington.edu/uwfarm