Slow Food Event! Urban Wild Edible Walk with “The Front Yard Forager” Melany Vorass

110212 - Weed Cuisine-001

Join Slow Food Seattle and author Melany Vorass on a walk through Golden Gardens. Melany is the author of the cookbook “The Front Yard Forager,” a guide to “identifying, collecting, and cooking the 30 most common urban weeds.”

During this leisurely stroll, Melany will discuss the plants found in Golden Gardens and all around Seattle. She’ll discuss identifying characteristics, harvesting considerations, and culinary ideas.

If you have been curious about wild food and foraging, this is an excellent introduction to the topic.

General public tickets are $15, Slow Food Members are $5. Members were recently sent the discount code. If you are a current member interested in signing up, but have not received the email with the code, please email us at membership@slowfoodseattle.org.

Sign up here. We are limited to 20 people, and foraging events always fill up quickly, so sign up soon!

 

Slow Food Book Club Meeting and Author Talk: Langdon Cook’s “The Mushroom Hunters”

mushroom_hunters_coverJust in time for morel season! We will be reading THE MUSHROOM HUNTERS by Langdon Cook for our May book club. And! Special bonus! Langdon Cook has graciously agreed to come join our chat (scheduling permitting). A great chance for us to support a local author and read a book that’s been getting critical raves since it came out. Join us!

We’ll be meeting on May 8 at the Beacon Hill Library at 6pm. We’ll have light refreshments.

You do not have to be a member to join our book club. It’s free, and there’s no commitment. Just come join fellow food lovers to chat about the titles that interest you!

Again, it’s free, but please do RSVP here.

 

Hunt, Gather, Cook: Finding the Forgotten Feast with Hank Shaw on July 28

Hank Shaw

Hank Shaw, author of "Hunt, Gather, Cook: Finding the Forgotten Feast"

The Pacific Northwest has a rich bounty of flora and fauna to offer from land, sky, and sea. Foraging, gleaning, hunting, fishing, crabbing, clamming… not just for the hardcore outdoorsy-crowd anymore. Join us on Thursday, July 28th at 6pm, for an evening with Hank Shaw, author of Hunt, Gather, Cook: Finding the Forgotten Feast. Hank will share his adventures in the field and in the kitchen with a talk on wild foods and book signing. Special guest, Chef Robin Leventhal (formerly of Crave & Top Chef), will also be on hand, serving up some delicious appetizers inspired by Hunt, Gather, Cook. Kevin Cedergreen of Cedergreen Cellars, Cole Sisson of Hestia Cellars, Melissa Peterman of Elsom Cellars, and the fine folks from McCrea Cellars will be pouring some fantastic Washington wines.

RSVP on Facebook too!

When: Thursday, July 28th at 6pm

Where: Wine World, 400 NE 45th St. Seattle, 98105

Tickets: $15/person (includes wild foods talk by Hank Shaw, wine tasting, and appetizers).

Brown Paper Tickets

Readers to Eaters will have Hunt, Gather, Cook available for purchase and Hank will be signing copies at the event.

Co-sponsored by: Slow Food Seattle, Readers to Eaters, and Wine World.

For a review of Hunt, Gather, Cook by Seattle Weekly’s Voracious contributor, Sonja Groset, check here.

For Hank’s perspective on the book, check out this post.

About Hank Shaw:
Hank Shaw is a New Jersey native who worked as a political reporter for various newspapers for 18 years until becoming a full-time food writer, outdoorsman and cook in 2010. A forager and angler since he could walk, Hank began hunting in 2002 and has never looked back. He hunts or fishes for all the meat he eats at home, and foraged foods form a daily part of his diet. Hank runs the wild foods blog Hunter Angler Gardener Cook, which has twice been nominated for a James Beard Award. He won the International Association of Culinary Professionals award for Best Blog in 2010 and 2011, and his magazine writing has appeared in Food & Wine, Organic Gardening, Field & Stream, as well as many other publications.

Hunt Gather CookAbout Hunt, Gather, Cook: Finding the Forgotten Feast:
If there is a frontier beyond organic, local, and seasonal, beyond farmers’ markets and sustainably
raised meat, it surely includes hunting, fishing, and foraging your own food. A lifelong angler and forager who became a hunter late in life, Hank Shaw has chronicled his passion for hunting and gathering in his widely read blog, Hunter Angler Gardener Cook, which has developed an avid following among outdoor people and foodies alike. Hank is dedicated to finding a place on the table for the myriad overlooked and underutilized wild foods that are there for the taking if you know how to get them.

In Hunt, Gather, Cook, he shares his experiences both in the field and the kitchen, as well as his extensive knowledge of North America’s edible flora and fauna. With the fresh, clever prose that brings so many readers to his blog, Hank provides a user-friendly, food-oriented introduction to tracking down everything from sassafras to striped bass to snowshoe hares. He then provides innovative ways to prepare wild foods that go far beyond typical campfire cuisine: homemade root beer, cured wild boar loin, boneless tempura shad, Sardinian hare stew, even pasta made with handmade acorn flour.

Thanks to our co-sponsors:

Wine World Warehouse      Readers to Eaters

Special thanks to our wine sponsors:

 Hestia CellarsCedergreen Cellars  Elsom Cellars        McCrea Cellars

Walnuts to Liqueur: Making Nocino with Chef Beth Maxey

Green Walnuts**This event has been rescheduled to July 31st, from 12:00-1:30**

Nocino is a traditional Italian liqueur made with green walnuts, spices and alcohol. It has a rich earthy flavor and is delicious as a digestive, over ice cream and as a reduction over duck breast…

Join Slow Food Seattle board member Chef Beth Maxey from 12:00 pm -1:30 pm on Saturday July 31st for a free hands-on Nocino making event in Volunteer Park and in an online community in the upcoming weeks as we share tips and forage for green walnuts (which are plentiful around the city).

Nocino making traditionally takes place during and after the festival of St. John the Baptist, where families and communities gather to feast and celebrate. Though we’re not celebrating a religious event, we’d love to preserve the conviviality of a community gathering. I’ll share my recipe from Italy as well as discuss regional variations and some of the technicalities of extractions. We’ll mix and mash nuts and flavorings and plan a follow-up tasting to see who really got it right. Also, since we will not add alcohol on site, only mash and mix the nuts, the event is appropriate (and fun) for kids too.

Follow us on Facebook? Here’s the event to RSVP and invite your friends. Follow the discussion here:
http://www.facebook.com/topic.php?uid=71899262386&topic=15380

Below are instructions and guidelines for foraging and sourcing your own green walnuts, which are abundant around Seattle. You are still welcome at the event if you cannot find any but we encourage you to try.

Vintage Nocino AdPlease reply to beth@slowfoodseattle.org to let us know you’re participating so we can accommodate everyone with interest and share foraging and Nocino making tips with you even if you cannot make the event.

A brief list of supplies and exact location will be sent to email responders before the event.

Foraging Instructions:

There are two types of edible walnuts. Black or English and Persian. Both can be found around the city. The following links provide a picture of leaves of each tree for your identification.

Green walnuts can be hard to see. I have found most trees by noticing the shells from last year’s crop on the ground. Ask around, though, and you will most likely find one.

Green walnuts are ready when you can insert a strait pin in them easily. If you find walnuts at this stage you can pick them and keep them in your refrigerator.

Be careful when picking as the walnuts and branches secrete a milky sap that will oxidize and stain your skin a deep brown. I suggest using gloves and protecting all surfaces they might come in contact with.

If you cannot find any walnuts, try the farmer’s market. They are a bit of a rare items but often if you ask farmer’s will pick them for you.

Squirrels are quite fond of green walnuts; try and beat them to it.

If you find a good tree, especially one on public land, let us know.

Black Walnut Leaves:
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/ext/senior/fruits/blackwalnut5.htm

Persian Walnut (also known as English Walnut) Leaves:
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/ext/senior/fruits/walnute5.htm

Nocino-making

Join Slow Food Seattle for “From Woods to Plate: Foraged Foods of the Pacific Northwest”

Forager and author Langdon Cook

Langdon Cook

**UPDATE: Though online ticket sales will end on Tuesday, June 15th at 1pm – you can still make it to hear Langdon’s talk and see an all new slide presentation  that night at the Montlake Community Center, 7pm. Limited tickets available at the door – come and bring your friends & family!**

Foraging is not just a throwback to our hunter-gatherer past. It’s a way to reconnect with the landscape whether rural or urban and eat healthy, delicious wild foods. Author and forager Langdon Cook will share his adventures in the field and in the kitchen with a lecture and slide presentation. Copies of his book Fat of the Land: Adventures of a 21st Century Forager will be available for purchase at the lecture.

7pm, Tuesday, June 15, 2010
Montlake Community Center
1618 East Calhoun St.
Seattle, WA 98112

Tickets: $15 Members*; $20 Non-Members

Purchase now at Brown Paper Tickets

Tickets onsale May 25

(*Slow Food Seattle members will receive a discount code for this event via email on Tuesday, May 25th – contact us if you are a current member and have not received the details.)

Follow us on Facebook? Here’s the event to RSVP and invite your friends.


Fat of the Land: Adventures of a 21st Century ForagerLangdon Cook is the author of Fat of the Land: Adventures of a 21st Century Forager. He was a senior book editor at Amazon.com before leaving the corporate world in 2004 to live in a cabin off the grid with his family. Now a freelance writer and blogger, Cook has written for Gray’s Sporting Journal, Outside, Fly Fisherman, The Stranger, Seattle Metropolitan, Northwest Palate, and numerous other publications. He has been profiled in Bon Appetit and WSJ magazine. Cook is a graduate of the University of Washington’s MFA program and a recipient of PEN Northwest’s Margery Boyden Wilderness Writing Residency. He lives in Seattle, Washington.