​Cat’s Ear Clam Linguine Recipe from Seattle Forager & Author Melany Vorass

Catsear LinguineThis post is part of our Fall Blog Blitz! For the next few weeks, we’ll be bringing you special posts in support of our Slow Food Fall Membership Campaign. Come back often for more recipes, photos, tips, and resources as we celebrate Slow Food in all its forms!

Slow Food membership supports sustainable food production, teaching children how to grow food, preserving traditional foods, and celebrating food cultures. Together we are linking the pleasure of good food with a commitment to local communities and the environment.  There is a place for you at our table here in our local Seattle chapter. Join now

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Catsear2We recently posted a Dandelion Bourekas recipe from Slow Food pal Melany Vorass. As noted in that post, we enjoyed a wild food walk with her this past spring. Melany showed us the impressive diversity of wild edibles in a small area at Golden Gardens Park. She’s a great inspiration and source of knowledge for those who are interested in doing more urban foraging. See photos from the day here.

Melany has shared another recipe with us, this one for cat’s ear, a wild green that, like dandelions, can also be harvested in the fall. (As always, please be sure you know your plant well before dining on any wild edible.)

Want to learn more? Check out Melany’s classes with Seattle Tilth! Her fall 2014 ID class is full but her cooking class still has spots!

And if you’d like more cooking tips on another wild food favorite – mushrooms – check out our November 3 mushroom event with Becky Selengut and Langdon Cook. Continue reading

Slow Food Event! Urban Wild Edible Walk with “The Front Yard Forager” Melany Vorass

110212 - Weed Cuisine-001

Join Slow Food Seattle and author Melany Vorass on a walk through Golden Gardens. Melany is the author of the cookbook “The Front Yard Forager,” a guide to “identifying, collecting, and cooking the 30 most common urban weeds.”

During this leisurely stroll, Melany will discuss the plants found in Golden Gardens and all around Seattle. She’ll discuss identifying characteristics, harvesting considerations, and culinary ideas.

If you have been curious about wild food and foraging, this is an excellent introduction to the topic.

General public tickets are $15, Slow Food Members are $5. Members were recently sent the discount code. If you are a current member interested in signing up, but have not received the email with the code, please email us at membership@slowfoodseattle.org.

Sign up here. We are limited to 20 people, and foraging events always fill up quickly, so sign up soon!

 

Slow Food Book Club Meeting and Author Talk: Langdon Cook’s “The Mushroom Hunters”

mushroom_hunters_coverJust in time for morel season! We will be reading THE MUSHROOM HUNTERS by Langdon Cook for our May book club. And! Special bonus! Langdon Cook has graciously agreed to come join our chat (scheduling permitting). A great chance for us to support a local author and read a book that’s been getting critical raves since it came out. Join us!

We’ll be meeting on May 8 at the Beacon Hill Library at 6:30-7:45pm (pls note the original time posted was incorrect) 6pm. We’ll have light refreshments.

You do not have to be a member to join our book club. It’s free, and there’s no commitment. Just come join fellow food lovers to chat about the titles that interest you!

Again, it’s free, but please do RSVP here.

 

Next Slow Food Seattle Book Club Meeting: Oct 17 – “THE GOOD FOOD REVOLUTION” by Will Allen

Will AllenWe are still finalizing location details, but wanted to give you all an early heads-up to give you plenty of time to read this great next selection for our Slow Food Seattle Book Club.

Will Allen’s autobiography, THE GOOD FOOD REVOLUTION, was just published in paperback. He’s coming to Seattle to speak at the Seattle Public Library Microsoft Auditorium on 11/20 and then as the key speaker at the Snohomish County Focus on Farming conference on 11/21. So it seems like a perfect time to read his book!

We will meet from 6:30-8pm. The book club is always free to attend and is open to members and non-members. It’s a fun, casual, welcoming group of folks who love good food and good books. We’d love to see you there!

We’ll either be meeting in Capitol Hill or the Roosevelt area, and we’ll have more details on this ASAP.

You can RSVP on our Facebook page. If you’re not on Facebook, feel free to email Leslie Seaton with your RSVP or any questions.

Here’s the blurb on the book:

A pioneering urban farmer and MacArthur Genius Award-Winner points the way to building a new food system that can feed- and heal- communities.

The son of a sharecropper, Will Allen had no intention of ever becoming a farmer himself. But after years in professional basketball and as an executive for Kentucky Fried Chicken and Procter & Gamble, he cashed in his retirement fund for a two-acre plot just outside Milwaukee’s largest public housing project. The area was a food desert with only convenience stores and fast-food restaurants to serve the needs of locals.

Despite financial challenges and daunting odds, Allen built the country’s preeminent urban farm-a food and educational center that now produces enough produce and fish year-round to feed thousands. Employing young people from the neighboring housing project and community, Growing Power shows how local food systems can help troubled youths, dismantle racism, create jobs, bring urban and rural communities closer together, and improve public health. Today, Allen’s organization helps develop community food systems across the country.

An eco-classic in the making, The Good Food Revolution is the story of Will’s personal journey, the lives he has touched, and a grassroots movement that is changing the way our nation eats.

Slow Food Seattle Books: September 8 – Food for All: Fixing School Food in America by Janet Poppendieck

Food for All: Fixing School Food in AmericaOur September book club selection is Food for All: Fixing School Food in America by Janet Poppendieck. RSVP on Facebook too!

We’ll be meeting from 6-7:30 p.m. on Thursday, September 8th. Roy Street Coffee and Tea is located at 700 Broadway East. Limited free parking is available in the lot below. This will be an active, open conversation and all are welcome – please come even if you haven’t had a chance to finish the book!

How did our children end up eating nachos, pizza, and tater tots for lunch? Taking us on an eye-opening journey into the nation’s school kitchens, this superbly researched book is the first to provide a comprehensive assessment of school food in the United States. Janet Poppendieck explores the deep politics of food provision from multiple perspectives–history, policy, nutrition, environmental sustainability, taste, and more.

Drawing from extensive interviews with officials, workers, students, and activists, she discusses the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs and turns a critical eye on the “competitive foods” sold in cafeterias. How did we get into the absurd situation in which nutritionally regulated meals compete with fast food items and snack foods loaded with sugar, salt, and fat? What is the nutritional profile of the federal meals? How well are they reaching students who need them?

Opening a window onto our culture as a whole, Poppendieck reveals the forces–the financial troubles of schools, the commercialization of childhood, the reliance on market models–that are determining how lunch is served. She concludes with a sweeping vision for change: fresh, healthy food for all children as a regular part of their school day.

Janet Poppendieck

Janet Poppendieck

Janet Poppendieck is Professor of Sociology at Hunter College, City University of New York. She is the author of Free for All: Fixing School Food in America; (University of California Press, 2010); Sweet Charity? Emergency Food and the End of Entitlement (Penguin, 1999); and Breadlines Knee Deep in Wheat: Food Assistance in the Great Depression (Rutgers University Press, 1985).

“In her extraordinarily well-thought-out, beautifully written, sympathetic, and compelling book, Jan Poppendieck makes clear that Free for All has two meanings: how pressures to reduce the cost of school meals put our children’s health at risk, and how best to solve this problem–universal school meals. Anyone who reads this book will find the present school lunch situation beyond unacceptable. Free for All is a call for action on behalf of America’s school kids, one that we all need to join. I will be using this book in all my classes.”–Marion Nestle, author of Food Politics

Slow Food Seattle Books: July 14 – The Unprejudiced Palate by Angelo Pellegrini

Angelo Pellegrini

Angelo Pellegrini: Slow Food, before Slow Food existed

Join us for our next book club selection on Thursday, July 14th, the classic - The Unprejudiced Palate: Classic Thoughts on Food and the Good Life by Seattle’s own Angelo Pellegrini.

Join us! This will be an active, open conversation and all are welcome – please come even if you haven’t had a chance to finish the book! We’ll be meeting from 6-7:30 p.m. on Thursday, July 14th. Roy Street Coffee and Tea is located at 700 Broadway East. Limited free parking is available in the lot below.  RSVP on Facebook too!

From the publisher:
“First issued in 1948, when soulless minute steaks and quick casseroles were becoming the norm, The Unprejudiced Palate inspired a seismic culinary shift in how America eats. Written by a food-loving immigrant from Tuscany, this memoir-cum-cookbook articulates the Italian American vision of the good life: a backyard garden, a well-cooked meal shared with family and friends, and a passion for ingredients and cooking that nourish the body and the soul.”

The Unprejudiced Palate“I have always thought that Angelo Pellegrini misnamed his charming but opinionated book. It should have been called the Prejudiced Palate, because he is so absolutely sure and unwavering in his vision of how to live a beautiful and delicious life. And I think he’s right.”
–Alice Waters, Owner, Chez Panisse

“Like great dishes, great writing remains in our memory forever. Angelo Pellegrini’s THE UNPREJUDICED PALATE is a lesson in how to enjoy life in an elegant and highly civilized way.”
– Jacques Pépin

“THE UNPREJUDICED PALATE is a forgotten gem from what might be remembered as the Golden Age of American food writing. This Italian born, beloved Seattle professor, friend and colleague of MFK Fisher, wrote with charm, wit, and a rare intelligence about food.”
–Mark Kurlansky, author of Salt, Cod, 1968

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