Slow Food Seattle Day of Service, September 22nd, 2012

Your volunteer power is needed on September 22!

Every year Slow Food Seattle organizes a “Day of Service”. To celebrate Day of Service we ask our members to join us as volunteers to help an organization with common values. Our Board has decided to focus our efforts this year on organizations that are cultivating and harvesting urban-grown food. The Slow Food Seattle Board nominated two great organizations for us to support for Day of Service—City Fruit and Alleycat Acres.

City Fruit promotes the cultivation of urban fruit in order to nourish people, build community and protect the climate. City Fruit helps tree owners grow healthy fruit, provide assistance in harvesting and preserving fruit, promote the sharing of extra fruit, and work to protect urban fruit trees.

Alleycat Acres connects people with food, through community run farms in under-utilized urban spaces.  By farming the cityscape, we are helping to create solutions that address a number of issues facing our communities. Our urban farms lay the groundwork to enable anyone to join in the process of what we refer to as Farming 2.0: cultivating food, relationships, and a connection to our land in an urban setting.

In years past we’ve chosen one organization among those that were nominated. This year the Board was a little indecisive. Since City Fruit and Alleycat Acres are both so worthy we said, “Hey, let’s support both!” It’s a tall task. We think we are up to it, but we need your help. We’re going to need twice as many volunteers this year because on September 22 one team of volunteers is going to help City Fruit and another team is going to help Alleycat Acres.

Board member Rob Salvino will lead the City Fruit volunteer team. Board member Renai Mielke will lead the Alleycat Acres volunteer team. To make things interesting we’re going to have a friendly competition to see who can recruit more volunteers—Rob or Renai. Visit our Facebook event page to learn more about the day’s activities and sign up for Rob’s City Fruit team or Renai’s Alleycat Acres team.

 

Join Team City Fruit!
The Slow Food Seattle volunteers who join Team City Fruit will maintain fruit trees along the Burke-Gilman Trail. The Burke-Gilman Trail Urban Orchard Stewards of the City Fruit program rescued 22 apple and pear trees along 1 1/2 miles of the Burke-Gilman Trail between the University Bridge and Gasworks Park. These trees provide fruit for passersby and for foodbanks. Team City Fruit will be weeding, planting daffodils, spreading mulch, and mooning bicyclists. Actually, that last part was just a joke. Mooning of cyclists will not be allowed. Even without the mooning we will have fun while lending a hand for a worthy cause. More details on time and location to come as the date nears!

Join Team Alleycat Acres!
The Slow Food Seattle volunteers who join Team Alleycat Acres will be working at the newest farm site on East Cherry St. & MLK in the Central District. We’ll be working on putting the garden to bed for winter- laying mulch and cover crops, and planting seeds and bulbs for spring crops. Many of these crops will be later donated to local food banks- delivered exclusively by bicycle! We’ll also have the opportunity to join in with another event happening at the same time – a local honey tasting, and talk with Alleycat’s residential beekeeper from Urban Bee Company. We’ll be meeting at the site at 9 AM and working until 1 PM. Please feel free to join us for any amount of time, or even just pop by around noon to check out the bees! Be sure to dress for the weather, and bring plenty of water.

When you RSVP for this event, please let us know in your comment which group you’d like to team up with. Feel free to bring kids, friends, family, co-workers, neighbors, etc, but please leave pets at home.

See you September 22!

Gothberg Farms Tour & Potluck – Sunday, August 12th

You Are Invited: Gothberg Farms Tour and Potluck

Gothberg FarmsSunday, August 12, 2012
11:30 am – 3 pm
15203 Sunset Road
Bow, Washington
$5 per person (covers the cost of facilities and staff to tour the farm)

Friends from Slow Food Seattle told Rhonda Gothberg they would like to come up to the Skagit Valley and visit her farm and cheesemaking facility. She agreed and said let’s make it a party, and invited the Slow Food Skagit River Salish Sea community, too, for a potluck!

Situated in pastoral Bow, her place is the perfect spot for a summer picnic. Bring a favorite locally sourced dish to share, as well as a beverage (beer and wine are okay), your own plate and flatware, and a lawn chair or two, if convenient. We will tour the facility, chat with each other about our beautiful area and our shared Slow Food values, then share a meal.

Consider checking out some of the local food spots afterwards with a self-guided tour of Slough Food, the Breadfarm, and Taylor Shellfish (Samish, in Bow).

Please RSVP to robin@cravefood.com or via the Facebook event! Limited to the first 50 people.

Gothberg Farms

This way to some deliciousness!

Gothberg Farms - LaMancha Goats

Gothberg Farms – LaMancha Goats. Image: chatterboxcheese.blogspot.com

Free Film Screening: “What’s Organic About Organic?” – Monday, August 22

Come watch What’s Organic About Organic – a thought-provoking documentary about the organic food debate – and then stick around to discuss what we can do to promote good, healthy, sustainable food in our community. Join us!

 

 

Please scroll to the bottom of the page in order to RSVP online for this event.

Location
The Q Café
3223 15th Avenue West
Seattle, WA 98119

Directions
Call the Q Cafe at 206.352.2525 for directions. Parking is available in the lot on the north side of the cafe. Additional parking is available in the Quest Church lot, north of the cafe. This lot is accessible from the drive that connects to W. Bertona St.

You are welcome to bring along friends or family! Contact Food & Water Watch organizer Marie Logan at mlogan@fwwatch.org or 415.293.9919 with any questions.

Use this flyer to spread the word about this event!

Co-sponsored by:

What's Organic About Organic?

Wild Salmon Returns to Washington’s Coast, Streams and Dinner Plates

Salmon. Photo: Barrie Kovish

Salmon. Photo: Barrie Kovish

As the calendar turns to May 1st – hooks and lines will be deployed from the sterns of Washington’s salmon trollers as the commercial fishing season officially opens. Once again, the Pacific Fisheries Management Council with the input from fishermen and fisheries biologists have checked the numbers, done the math and deemed that Washington’s Chinook salmon runs were strong enough to support a commercial fishery in 2011. Though this will sound counter intuitive, a commercial fishery means a good thing for health of wild salmon.

The survival and restoration of wild salmon is the top priority for fisheries managers. If the salmon numbers are not at a sustainable level, not one hook is allowed to meet the surface of the ocean or the lip of a salmon and fishing boats stay tied to the dock. Fishermen have long recognized that not fishing is sometime a necessary hardship face in order to fulfill their roles as stewards of the natural resource known as wild salmon. But stewardship of wild salmon is not just something for commercial fishermen and fisheries biologist to be concerned about. Eaters of wild salmon can also do their part as stewards of wild salmon. And yes, eating them is one of those things! The action of eating salmon reminds us with each delicious bite why we need to be conscious of our actions away from the dinner table and in other parts of our lives that might directly or indirectly affect the survival of wild salmon.

Conservation Area at Full Circle Farm, Carnation, WA. Photo: Roddy Scheer

Conservation Area at Full Circle Farm, Carnation, WA. Photo: Roddy Scheer

Take the simple act of brushing your teeth. The habit of turning the water off while brushing can save a gallon of water each time you polish your pearly whites. One gallon, twice a day for 365 days…okay, 730 gallons of water! Why is this important? Salmon need fresh cold water in streams, not down drains, to complete their life-cycles. Same goes for washing your car. Using the car wash not only saves water but all the chemicals and oil that make your car dirty are filtered before they go down the drain and out to sea. Wash your car at home and the waste water washes into a gutter untreated or soaks in to your lawn on its way back to the ground water system. And lawns? Plant a rain garden or a drought tolerant variety of grass and limit the use of fertilizers and other chemicals.

If you would like to visit the streams that will be benefiting from your newly found water conscious ways, consider volunteering for an afternoon of habitat restoration with a local salmon conservation group such as Long Live the Kings, Mid Sound Fisheries Enhancement Group or the North Olympic Salmon Coalition. Or what about joining Slow Food Seattle, Edible Seattle and the Stewardship Partners on Saturday, May 28th on the banks of Griffin Creek and the Snoqualmie River at Full Circle Farm near Carnation, WA to do your part to save wild salmon by restoring a stretch of water essential to salmon spawning success? It is your choice whether wield a shovel or a camera. All levels of activity and support are welcome.

For more information and to register to participate please contact Stewardship Partnership’s Volunteer Coordinator, Alex Ko. Once you register you will receive complete details and directions.
Share on Facebook too: RSVP on Facebook too!

Should you decide to join us for the work day, here are a few things to bring and remember:

  • It is the Pacific NW so dress in layers, bring rain gear, gloves and wear sturdy shoes or boots.
  • Bring your own snacks and water.
  • You will be outside and ‘facilities’ may be limited.
  • Come ready to work but be mindful of your own limitations. Please don’t over do it!

To read more about wild salmon habitat, check out the story in the May/June edition of Edible Seattle.

See you down by the Creek!

- Amy Grondin, Slow Food Seattle Board Member

Flowers and Barn at Full Circle Farm, Carnation, WA. Photo: Roddy Scheer

Flowers and Barn at Full Circle Farm, Carnation, WA. Photo: Roddy Scheer

Next Slow Food Seattle Books Meeting: May 12

Kurt Timmermeister

Kurt Timmermeister

Join us on May 12 for the next Slow Food Seattle Books!

Our May book club selection is Kurt Timmermeister’s, Growing a Farmer: How I Learned to Live Off the Land.

“An intimate look at the life and livelihood of a modern-day farmer, as told by a former urbanite. A bona-fide city dweller, Kurt Timmermeister never intended to run his own dairy farm. When he purchased four acres of land on Vashon

Island, he was looking for an affordable home a ferry ride away from the restaurants he ran in Seattle. But as he continued to serve his customers frozen chicken breasts and packaged pork, he became aware of the connection between what he ate and where it came from: a hive of bees provided honey; a young cow could give fresh milk; an apple orchard allowed him to make vinegar.

Growing a FarmerTold in Timmermeister’s plainspoken voice, Growing a Farmer details with honesty the initial stumbles and subsequent realities he had to face in his quest to establish a profitable farm for himself. Personal yet

practical, Growing a Farmer includes the specifics of making cheese, raising cows, and slaughtering pigs, and it will recast entirely the way we think about our relationship to the food we consume.”

Join us! This will be an active, open conversation and all are welcome – please come even if you haven’t had a chance to finish the book! We’ll be meeting from 6-7:30 p.m. on Thursday, May 12. Roy Street Coffee and Tea is located at 700 Broadway East. Limited free parking is available in the lot below.

Please post questions as you’re reading for Kurt in the comments here or on our Reading Discussion on Facebook. Kurt has generously agreed to answer them for us!

RSVP to books@slowfoodseattle.org RSVP on Facebook too!

Want to pick up a copy of Growing a Farmer? Here’s a list of local booksellers, also available via our Amazon store.

Kurt Timmermeister

Nominee for Slow Food USA’s Ark of Taste: The Sugar Hubbard Squash

Slow Food’s Ark of Taste aims to rediscover, describe and publicize forgotten flavors around the world. Through the Ark of Taste program, Slow Food USA has a catalog of over 200 delicious foods in danger of extinction. Since 1996, more than 800 products from over 50 countries have been added to the international Ark of Taste. By promoting and eating Ark products we help ensure that they remain in production and on our plates.

The mission of the Slow Food Ark of Taste is to preserve traditional tastes and to celebrate them, by introducing them to the Slow Food membership and then to the world. All of the foods on the Ark of Taste are heritage products that have real economic viability and commercial potential for the communities that grow, produce or harvest them.

Since it’s inception, Slow Food Seattle has successfully boarded four regional food products onto the Slow Food Ark of Taste including Olympia Oyster, Marbled Chinook Salmon, Geoduck, and Makah Ozette Potato (our only Presidium product). Slow Food Seattle’s latest Ark of Taste nomination is the Sugar Hubbard, a sweet heirloom winter squash with a unique Puget Sound heritage. Former Slow Food Seattle Co-Chair, and Puget Sound Food Network Project Manager, Lucy Norris, recently wrote about this important heirloom in the winter 2010 issue of Edible Seattle.

Read the full story in Edible Seattle, or download a PDF version.

Sugar Hubbard Squash

The Sugar Hubbard Squash, grown at Sherman's Pioneer Farm Produce in central Whidbey Island, is Slow Food Seattle's latest nomination for the Ark of Taste.

Sherman’s Pioneer Farm Produce in central Whidbey Island grows the only commercial crop of Sugar Hubbard in the country. It is the result of combining traditional blue Hubbard and Sweetmeat squash, inheriting the best flavor and texture characteristics of both. The Sugar Hubbard is a nutrient dense, starchy squash (with a high glycemic index), but also very high in vitamin A, exceeding USDA requirements for Beta Carotene. Most winter squash varieties are interchangeable in recipes, and the Sugar Hubbard is nutty-sweet and the colored deep orange like a marigold. Try it in a favorite recipe that calls for winter squash, and you’ll be impressed.

The Sugar Hubbard has an excellent flavor, and it’s uniquely local to Puget Sound, with a strong family heritage. It has every asset required for boarding onto Slow Food’s Ark of Taste. Slow Food Seattle’s interest in boarding this product on the Ark of Taste will send a signal to conscientious consumers and help boost market demand in our area. Voting with your fork helps food producers like the Sherman’s remain profitable in the business of farming in our region. Only the best tasting endangered foods make it onto the Ark, and we think the Sugar Hubbard is a great fit.

Find the Squash
Peeled squash cubes are available at all Whole Foods locations in Oregon and Washington as long as the supply holds out. Liz and Dale continue to look for additional retailers for their squash. Sherman’s Pioneer Farm Produce is located at 46 South Ebey Road, Coupeville, WA. Contact Liz or Dale Sherman at 360.678.4675.

Looking for recipes?
Spice Loaf – by Editor, Edible Seattle
Chili Stew – by Lucy Norris, adapted from an original recipe by Liz Sherman

Excerpts with permission from Edible Seattle.

Dale Sherman in his field of Sugar Hubbard Squash

Dale Sherman in his field of Sugar Hubbard squash. Photo: Lara Ferroni

Lucy Norris is Project Manager for Puget Sound Food Network, a project of the Northwest Agriculture Business Center, former co-chair of Slow Food Seattle, and author of Pickled: Preserving a World of Tastes and Traditions.