Slow Food Seattle Day of Service, September 22nd, 2012

Your volunteer power is needed on September 22!

Every year Slow Food Seattle organizes a “Day of Service”. To celebrate Day of Service we ask our members to join us as volunteers to help an organization with common values. Our Board has decided to focus our efforts this year on organizations that are cultivating and harvesting urban-grown food. The Slow Food Seattle Board nominated two great organizations for us to support for Day of Service—City Fruit and Alleycat Acres.

City Fruit promotes the cultivation of urban fruit in order to nourish people, build community and protect the climate. City Fruit helps tree owners grow healthy fruit, provide assistance in harvesting and preserving fruit, promote the sharing of extra fruit, and work to protect urban fruit trees.

Alleycat Acres connects people with food, through community run farms in under-utilized urban spaces.  By farming the cityscape, we are helping to create solutions that address a number of issues facing our communities. Our urban farms lay the groundwork to enable anyone to join in the process of what we refer to as Farming 2.0: cultivating food, relationships, and a connection to our land in an urban setting.

In years past we’ve chosen one organization among those that were nominated. This year the Board was a little indecisive. Since City Fruit and Alleycat Acres are both so worthy we said, “Hey, let’s support both!” It’s a tall task. We think we are up to it, but we need your help. We’re going to need twice as many volunteers this year because on September 22 one team of volunteers is going to help City Fruit and another team is going to help Alleycat Acres.

Board member Rob Salvino will lead the City Fruit volunteer team. Board member Renai Mielke will lead the Alleycat Acres volunteer team. To make things interesting we’re going to have a friendly competition to see who can recruit more volunteers—Rob or Renai. Visit our Facebook event page to learn more about the day’s activities and sign up for Rob’s City Fruit team or Renai’s Alleycat Acres team.

 

Join Team City Fruit!
The Slow Food Seattle volunteers who join Team City Fruit will maintain fruit trees along the Burke-Gilman Trail. The Burke-Gilman Trail Urban Orchard Stewards of the City Fruit program rescued 22 apple and pear trees along 1 1/2 miles of the Burke-Gilman Trail between the University Bridge and Gasworks Park. These trees provide fruit for passersby and for foodbanks. Team City Fruit will be weeding, planting daffodils, spreading mulch, and mooning bicyclists. Actually, that last part was just a joke. Mooning of cyclists will not be allowed. Even without the mooning we will have fun while lending a hand for a worthy cause. More details on time and location to come as the date nears!

Join Team Alleycat Acres!
The Slow Food Seattle volunteers who join Team Alleycat Acres will be working at the newest farm site on East Cherry St. & MLK in the Central District. We’ll be working on putting the garden to bed for winter- laying mulch and cover crops, and planting seeds and bulbs for spring crops. Many of these crops will be later donated to local food banks- delivered exclusively by bicycle! We’ll also have the opportunity to join in with another event happening at the same time – a local honey tasting, and talk with Alleycat’s residential beekeeper from Urban Bee Company. We’ll be meeting at the site at 9 AM and working until 1 PM. Please feel free to join us for any amount of time, or even just pop by around noon to check out the bees! Be sure to dress for the weather, and bring plenty of water.

When you RSVP for this event, please let us know in your comment which group you’d like to team up with. Feel free to bring kids, friends, family, co-workers, neighbors, etc, but please leave pets at home.

See you September 22!

Gothberg Farms Tour & Potluck – Sunday, August 12th

You Are Invited: Gothberg Farms Tour and Potluck

Gothberg FarmsSunday, August 12, 2012
11:30 am – 3 pm
15203 Sunset Road
Bow, Washington
$5 per person (covers the cost of facilities and staff to tour the farm)

Friends from Slow Food Seattle told Rhonda Gothberg they would like to come up to the Skagit Valley and visit her farm and cheesemaking facility. She agreed and said let’s make it a party, and invited the Slow Food Skagit River Salish Sea community, too, for a potluck!

Situated in pastoral Bow, her place is the perfect spot for a summer picnic. Bring a favorite locally sourced dish to share, as well as a beverage (beer and wine are okay), your own plate and flatware, and a lawn chair or two, if convenient. We will tour the facility, chat with each other about our beautiful area and our shared Slow Food values, then share a meal.

Consider checking out some of the local food spots afterwards with a self-guided tour of Slough Food, the Breadfarm, and Taylor Shellfish (Samish, in Bow).

Please RSVP to robin@cravefood.com or via the Facebook event! Limited to the first 50 people.

Gothberg Farms

This way to some deliciousness!

Gothberg Farms - LaMancha Goats

Gothberg Farms – LaMancha Goats. Image: chatterboxcheese.blogspot.com

“Eat It to Save It!” Bristol Bay Salmon Dinner on July 24th

Chef Robin Leventhal. Photo: Seattle WeeklyJoin Slow Food Seattle in supporting the great advocacy work of Save Bristol Bay on Tuesday, July 24th at Local 360 with SFS board member and Top Chef alum, Chef Robin Leventhal to cook up awareness and support with their Eat It to Save It Bristol Bay Salmon Dinner. Joining the ranks of more than 50 restaurants nationwide, the event promises to shine a light on a proposed Pebble mine at Bristol Bay, Alaska that threatens to change the landscape of our ecosystem and the very survival of the northwest’s most beloved fish – the sockeye salmon.

The Eat It to Save It Bristol Bay Salmon Dinner will feature a 3-course menu for $35, with salmon-safe wine pairings for an additional $15, in the main dining room from 3pm to 10pm. There will also be a special opportunity to enjoy a 6-course menu prepared by Chef Leventhal in Local 360’s private dining room at 7pm. Offered at $85 per guest, this exquisite meal will feature wine pairings by Novelty Hill • Januik, a salmon-safe winery. A portion of all proceeds for the evening will go to Save Bristol Bay.

Reservations can be made at reservations@local360.org or by calling 206.441.9360 – don’t delay as this event will sell out.

Eat It To Save It

Chef Robin Leventhal’s Menu – 3 Courses for $35
Paired with Novelty Hill • Januik salmon-safe local wines for $15

  • 1st Course: Smoked Salmon Rillette, Crostini
  • 2nd Course: Salmon Tartar, Fennel, Capers, Creme Fraiche
  • 3rd Course: Seared Salmon, Paprika Polenta, Spicy Orange Molasses BBQ

Private Dining Room Menu – 6 Courses for $85
Paired with Novelty Hill • Januik salmon-safe local wines
Prepared by Crave Chef, Robin Leventhal

  • 1st Course: Beet cured Gravlax, Ozette Purple Potato Lattke, Pickled Shallot, Fennel Pollen, Crème Fraiche
  • 2nd Course: Chilled Cucumber Avocado Shooter, Smoked Salmon Roe, Preserved Lemon Gremolata
  • 3rd Course: Salmon Rillette, Pickled Egg Gribiche, Pumpernickel,
  • 4th Course: Seared Salmon Belly, Sea Beans, Miso Ginger Emulsion, Black Sesame oil
  • 5th Course: Coriander Seared Salmon Fillet, Roasted Corn Pudding, Poblano Verde
  • 6th Course: Mascarpone Panna Cotta, Cardamom Blueberry compote, Candied Salmon Skin Crackling

Click below for more participating restaurants in Seattle and across the US.

Eat Wild Salmon. Save Wild Places.

Summer picnic at Golden Gardens Park – join us on June 30th!

Join us for the first of our seasonal potlucks on Saturday, June 30th!

Get your summer picnic tickets now!We plan to hold potlucks for each of the coming seasons and this one marks the beginning of summer with all of it’s bountiful ingredients. Share your favorite BBQ/picnic dish with fellow Slow Food members and supporters in the beautiful Golden Gardens park, with a view of the Olympic Mountains.

Bring a dish and bring the family!

We’ll provide some refreshments, briquettes for the BBQ and condiments. Please bring your own plates, napkins, eating utensils and cups. Also additional beverages are welcomed. This is an alcohol-free picnic site and we leave the rest to your discretion. Families, kids, all welcome. Dogs are required to be on leash. We have the site from 3-10pm and will start clean up at 9pm as the sun sets.

$5/person (kids free) suggested donation to help offset event costs. We also have a pay what you can option, where you can pay less or if you’d like to or add in an extra donation too. RSVP by Friday, June 29th via Brown Paper Tickets.

Questions?
Contact info@slowfoodseattle.org

The Details:

Summer Potluck at Golden Gardens
DATE: Saturday, June 30, 2012
TIME: 3:00 – 9:00 PM
LOCATION: Golden Gardens Park – 8498 Seaview Pl. NW, Seattle, WA – directions here

SFS Books: May 10th – Poisoned: The True Story of the Deadly E. Coli Outbreak That Changed the Way Americans Eat

 

Poisoned: The True Story of the Deadly E. Coli Outbreak That Changed the Way Americans Eat Our May book club selection is Poisoned: The True Story of the Deadly E. Coli Outbreak That Changed the Way Americans Eat by Jeff Benedict

This will be an active, open conversation and all are welcome – please come even if you haven’t had a chance to finish the book! We’ll be meeting from 6-7:30 p.m. on Thursday, May 10th. Roy Street Coffee and Tea is located at 700 Broadway East. Limited free parking is available in the lot below.

Interested in food safety? Curious about how the common, yet sometimes deadly E. coli bacteria shows up not only in ground meat, but also strawberries, spinach and sprouts?

Join the Slow Food Seattle Book Club for a discussion of Jeff Benedict’s Poisoned: The True Story of the Deadly E. Coli Outbreak That Changed the Way Americans Eat. Benedict tells the story of the 1993 E. coli break-out in Jack in the Box hamburger meat through main characters nine-year old Brianne, who came close to dying and still lives with the impact of the episode, and Bainbridge Island-based lawyer, Bill Marler, who took on her case as a young lawyer.

“Over a period of a few weeks, more than 700 cases scattered across four Western states; four children died gruesomely, with bleeding intestines and kidney failure. But Mr. Benedict, a lawyer turned journalist, pays relatively little attention to the story’s medical complexities; his focus is the gruesome and complicated legal tangle that ensued. Nowadays we are all too familiar with the practices of giant processing plants, but back in those innocent times it was all new and appalling — the poorly regulated slaughterhouses, the batching of meat for grinding, the wide distribution of product, which maximized the spread of any contaminant.” — Abigail Zuger, M.D., New York Times, June 27, 2011

Jeff Benedict and Bill Marler

Author, Jeff Benedict (left) and attorney, Bill Marler (right). Photo: WSU Photo Services

Poisoned is as relevant today as it is to the 1993 story it tells. Just months after the book’s 2011 publication, another E. coli outbreak, this time in Germany, was traced back to salad vegetables.

“Although much more is known about food safety now than in 1993, the book speaks to our times. Earlier this month, the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced that six more strains of E. coli will be banned from ground beef. That move follows pressure from Marler and represents a step forward in the fight for safe food, which is what “Poisoned” is all about.” — Lynne Terry, The Oregonian, September 24, 2011

Please join us! If you haven’t had a chance to read the book, find an excerpt here: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/28/health/28excerpt.html?_r=1&ref=views#

RSVP to books@slowfoodseattle.org and/or on the Facebook event page

About Jeff Benedict
Jeff Benedict is a contributor for Sports Illustrated and a writer for SI.com.  In 2011 he launched Inspire Books, his own book publishing imprint.  He published Poisoned: The True Story of the Deadly E. coli Outbreak that Changed the way Americans Eat under the new imprint.  Poisoned is Benedict’s tenth book and critics consider it his best.  The New York Times called it “the full literary experience of a medico-legal thriller in a work of nonfiction.”

Benedict was born in 1966 in New London, Connecticut. He has a Bachelor’s in History from Eastern Connecticut State University, a Master’s in Political Science from Northeastern University, and a J.D. from the New England School of Law. He previously practiced law in Connecticut, where he has spent most of his life. Today he lives in Virginia where he teaches Writing and Mass Media at Southern Virginia University and lives on a Civil War-era farm with his wife and best friend Lydia Benedict and their four children. http://www.jeffbenedict.com

The Makah Ozette Potato Presidium – Spring 2012

Photo by Yunhee Kim for Sunset Magazine

Makah Ozette potatoes with bacon cream. (Photo by Yunhee Kim for Sunset Magazine)

In the 1980’s an unknown fingerling potato was recognized to be a staple in the diet of Pacific Coast Native Americans of the Makah Nation. The Makah occupy the region around Neah Bay, Washington, that is the most northwesterly point in the United States. Tribal lore reported that this potato had been used by these people for about 200 years. The Makah had named this potato the Ozette after one of their five villages located around Neah Bay.  More about the Ozette and how it became part of the Ark of Taste can be found here. The presidium is focused on increasing seed production to bring more seed to market. Here is where those efforts stand currently:

  • After flooding annihilated the seed crop of 2010, our partner Pure Potato had to start again with the three year process of producing an abundant crop of certified seed potato. A project they had just completed. We are grateful they are willing to do it again.
  • The Certified Generation program starts with PreNuclear minitubers. These are first grown in “test tube” then planted in the green house.  The resulting crop of mini tubers is planted the next year for reproduction in the field and then classified as Nuclear.  The following years they are classified as Generation 1, 2, etc. as long as they remain within the disease parameters specified by the Department of Agriculture.
  • This Spring Pure Potato will plant 32 pounds of PreNuclear Makah Ozette minitubers in the field. This should yield approximately 30 one hundred pound sacks of Nuclear seed potato. In the spring of 2013 they will plant 16 sacks per acre that will yield 200 sacks per acre.
Makah Ozette Potato

Makah Ozette Potato

The question for Pure Potato is; how much to plant and how much to sell in 2013? We need potential growers to tell us of their intentions and to get on the list for notification of availability by emailing marlys@purepotato.com.

Next year, 2013, depending on the yield, there may be a limited supply of Nuclear Generation Makah Ozette seed potatoes for sale at $2.00 per pound. The plan is to keep reproducing this variety and increase the volume to meet the needs of all those interested in growing it.

This spring there is some seed available from Potato Garden (800.314.1955, cdrockey@potatogarden.com).

Gerry Warren
Presidium Coordinator
cgw@speakeasy.net, 206.818.5366

Resources:

For the history and back story of this potato go to the Makah Ozette Presidia page at Slow Food USA or here for more.

Makah Ozette Potato brochure [PDF]

Pure Potato
marlys@purepotato.com
360.354.6555
9020 Jackman Rd
Lynden, WA 98264

Potato Garden
cdrockey@potatogarden.com
800.314.1955
12101 2135 Rd
Austin, CO 81410