My fish has issues; it’s complicated – Sustainable Seafood in a Multimedia World

By Amy Grondin

My Fish has Issues; it's complicated - Sustainable Seafood in a Multimedia WorldJoin Slow Food Seattle for My fish has issues; it’s complicated – Sustainable Seafood in a Multimedia World, a conversation with Chefs Barton Seaver and Becky Selengut at the Broadway Performance Hall on Monday October 17th from 6:30pm to 8pm. A cookbook signing and reception featuring Snoqualmie Vineyards, The Pike Brewing Company, and an oyster bar from Taylor Shellfish will follow from 8pm to 8:45pm. Tickets available now through Brown Paper Tickets, $12/pp.

It’s time to cut through the fog of confusion that surrounds choosing and eating seafood. Sustainable seafood can be enjoyed in such a way that our personal health and the health of the oceans are of equal consideration. There are lots of sustainable seafood options to be had but how do we identify them?

Becky Selengut and Barton Seaver

Becky Selengut and Barton Seaver

East coast meets West coast for this fun and informative sustainable seafood presentation with Becky Selengut, our own local fish whisperer, and Barton Seaver, who’s visiting from D.C. While cooking is a hands on activity that engages all your senses, these two chefs have also engaged their minds and ethics in the process without finger pointing at those of us who are still learning about sustainable seafood. We can benefit from their research and hours in the kitchen by reading the sustainable seafood cookbooks each chef released in Spring of 2011

The evening’s conversation will appeal to folks who receive their information in many different ways, from slow as the printed word to speedy as devices can deliver. As part of the presentation our chefs, led by edibleSEATTLE editor Jill Lightner, will talk about how technology allows them to engage with eaters who may be new to seafood and not necessarily cookbook readers who specifically sought out a sustainable seafood book. Love your smartphone? Smart and sassy blog and Facebook posts, Tweets, websites and YouTube videos by Becky and Barton are just a click away.

Or perhaps you would rather meander printed pages that are glossy with images of seafood briny and sweet from the ocean? A person can pick up either chefs’ cookbook and get the full story – recipes with a dash of science sprinkled in as seasoning. Pick up your copy of For Cod & Country, Barton’s cookbook or Good Fish, Becky’s cookbook after the presentation.

Good Fish   For Cod & Country

What might you learn from our chefs? Both Becky and Barton encourage us to eat a variety of fish besides the perennial favorites of shrimp, salmon and tuna.

Eating a variety of seafood protects the health of humans and fish populations. Creating a marketplace demand for many types of fish eases the pressure on the whole ocean food web by spreading harvest efforts over many species and not over fishing a one popular fish.

An example? Small silver fish – once popular, then over fished due to market demand but on the rise again – just might make it back to everyone’s dinner plate as Barton and Becky’s followers learn from reading a computer screen or a cookbook page about recipes that balance the fishes intense flavor so the rich, nutritional qualities of these environmentally friendly fish are enjoyed.

And in or out of a tin, we need to get over our national suspicion of small silver fish; they are delicious, not scary! Join us on Monday October 17th and we’ll talk about it.

Speakers:

Thanks to our event sponsor, Seafood Producers Cooperative for their generous support and also to our presenting partners: Readers to EatersSnoqualmie Vineyards, Pike Brewing Company, Taylor Shellfish, and edibleSeattle.

Seafood Producers Cooperative   Readers to EatersEdible Seattle

Snoqualmie Winery    Pike Place Brewery  Taylor Shellfish

Volunteers still needed – this Saturday, May 28th, 10am-2pm!

Join us for an afternoon of habitat restoration at Full Circle Farm led by Stewardship Partners on Saturday, May 28th on the banks of Griffin Creek and the Snoqualmie River. Do your part to save wild salmon by restoring a stretch of water essential to salmon spawning success. It is your choice whether wield a shovel or a camera. All levels of activity and support are welcome. Co-Sponsors for the work party are: Edible Seattle, Full Circle Farm, and Stewardship Partners.

Contact Alex Ko from Stewardship Partners today to RSVP at 206.292.9875.

 

The trail building is from 10am-2pm at Full Circle Farm in Carnation. Please try to arrive promptly at ten or slightly before, as the trail is about 2/3 of a mile from the parking lot, and we have a tractor taking volunteers out on the dot. Feel free to bring friends and family! There will be pastries and donuts, generously donated by Grateful Bread bakery of Seattle, and coffee provided by Starbucks.

A few things to remember:

  • It is the Pacific NW so dress in layers, bring raingear, gloves and wear sturdy shoes or boots
  • Bring your own snacks and water
  • You will be outside and ‘facilities’ may be limited
  • Come ready to work but be mindful of your own limitations. Please don’t overdo it.

Driving directions from Seattle:

  • Take 1-90E
  • Take exit 22 towards Preston/Fall City
  • Turn left at SE 82nd St
  • Turn right at SE High Point Way/Preston Fall City Rd SE
  • Continue to follow Preston Fall City Rd SE
  • Turn Right at WA-202 E/SE Redmond Fall City Rd/River St
  • At the traffic circle, take the 2nd exit onto WA-203 N/Fall City Carnation Rd SE
  • Turn left at NE 8th St
  • Drive to small white house and park in lot

Share on Facebook too: RSVP on Facebook too!

To read more about wild salmon habitat, check out the story in the May/June edition of Edible Seattle.

Wild Salmon Returns to Washington’s Coast, Streams and Dinner Plates

Salmon. Photo: Barrie Kovish

Salmon. Photo: Barrie Kovish

As the calendar turns to May 1st – hooks and lines will be deployed from the sterns of Washington’s salmon trollers as the commercial fishing season officially opens. Once again, the Pacific Fisheries Management Council with the input from fishermen and fisheries biologists have checked the numbers, done the math and deemed that Washington’s Chinook salmon runs were strong enough to support a commercial fishery in 2011. Though this will sound counter intuitive, a commercial fishery means a good thing for health of wild salmon.

The survival and restoration of wild salmon is the top priority for fisheries managers. If the salmon numbers are not at a sustainable level, not one hook is allowed to meet the surface of the ocean or the lip of a salmon and fishing boats stay tied to the dock. Fishermen have long recognized that not fishing is sometime a necessary hardship face in order to fulfill their roles as stewards of the natural resource known as wild salmon. But stewardship of wild salmon is not just something for commercial fishermen and fisheries biologist to be concerned about. Eaters of wild salmon can also do their part as stewards of wild salmon. And yes, eating them is one of those things! The action of eating salmon reminds us with each delicious bite why we need to be conscious of our actions away from the dinner table and in other parts of our lives that might directly or indirectly affect the survival of wild salmon.

Conservation Area at Full Circle Farm, Carnation, WA. Photo: Roddy Scheer

Conservation Area at Full Circle Farm, Carnation, WA. Photo: Roddy Scheer

Take the simple act of brushing your teeth. The habit of turning the water off while brushing can save a gallon of water each time you polish your pearly whites. One gallon, twice a day for 365 days…okay, 730 gallons of water! Why is this important? Salmon need fresh cold water in streams, not down drains, to complete their life-cycles. Same goes for washing your car. Using the car wash not only saves water but all the chemicals and oil that make your car dirty are filtered before they go down the drain and out to sea. Wash your car at home and the waste water washes into a gutter untreated or soaks in to your lawn on its way back to the ground water system. And lawns? Plant a rain garden or a drought tolerant variety of grass and limit the use of fertilizers and other chemicals.

If you would like to visit the streams that will be benefiting from your newly found water conscious ways, consider volunteering for an afternoon of habitat restoration with a local salmon conservation group such as Long Live the Kings, Mid Sound Fisheries Enhancement Group or the North Olympic Salmon Coalition. Or what about joining Slow Food Seattle, Edible Seattle and the Stewardship Partners on Saturday, May 28th on the banks of Griffin Creek and the Snoqualmie River at Full Circle Farm near Carnation, WA to do your part to save wild salmon by restoring a stretch of water essential to salmon spawning success? It is your choice whether wield a shovel or a camera. All levels of activity and support are welcome.

For more information and to register to participate please contact Stewardship Partnership’s Volunteer Coordinator, Alex Ko. Once you register you will receive complete details and directions.
Share on Facebook too: RSVP on Facebook too!

Should you decide to join us for the work day, here are a few things to bring and remember:

  • It is the Pacific NW so dress in layers, bring rain gear, gloves and wear sturdy shoes or boots.
  • Bring your own snacks and water.
  • You will be outside and ‘facilities’ may be limited.
  • Come ready to work but be mindful of your own limitations. Please don’t over do it!

To read more about wild salmon habitat, check out the story in the May/June edition of Edible Seattle.

See you down by the Creek!

- Amy Grondin, Slow Food Seattle Board Member

Flowers and Barn at Full Circle Farm, Carnation, WA. Photo: Roddy Scheer

Flowers and Barn at Full Circle Farm, Carnation, WA. Photo: Roddy Scheer

Old-fashioned strawberry social – join us, July 7!

Anthony's HomePort Strawberry ShortcakeJoin Slow Food Seattle, Jon Rowley, Anthony’s Homeport, Edible Seattle, and Parfait Ice Cream for a taste of summer – and all things strawberry!

Strawberry shortcake, strawberry lemonade, strawberry ice cream, and a tasting of local strawberry varieties! There will even be a cash bar available with strawberry margaritas…

Strawberry growers Steve Schuh of Schuh Farms, Chris McKnight of Thulen Farms in the Skagit Valley, and Russ & Dan Picha from Picha Farms in the Puyallup Valley will attend the Strawberry Social and bring the strawberries that are still available to compare and be available to discuss strawberry growing and varieties in the Northwest.

Space is limited to 40 guests, please RSVP by Tuesday, July 6th to info@slowfoodseattle.org with your name and the names of those in your party. We’ll reply with a confirmation that you’re on the list as well as if we’re already at capacity.

Wednesday, July 7, 2010 – 5 to 7pm

Admission:
FREE for Slow Food members and all kids
$5/person for non-member adults
(all donations welcome, cash only at the door)

Location:
Anthony’s HomePort Shilshole Bay
6135 Seaview Ave. NW
Seattle, WA 98107