Line-up for this weekend’s Artisan Food Festival

We’ve got the schedule confirmed for the Slow Food Seattle booth (look for us near the Chef Demo stage) at the Pike Place Market Artisan Food Festival coming up this weekend on Saturday, Sept. 25 and Sunday, Sept. 26.

Readers to EatersOur friends at Readers to Eaters will be joining us with books and speakers on both days. Readers to Eaters promotes food literacy through community food events, education programs, book publishing, and a mobile bookstore.

Saturday, Sept. 25

Sunday, Sept. 26
Come by and learn more about what we do at Slow Food Seattle, our upcoming events, and how to get involved in the Slow Food movement.

Need a map of the festival? Right-click on the Adobe logo to download. Adobe Acrobat PDFLook for us near the Chef Demo stage.

The last quarter of the 20th Century has seen a craft food renaissance world wide. Slow Food, the powerful consumer movement founded in Italy as a counter to fast food, is said to be the biggest consumer based food movement in history. The U.S.-the country that invented the supermarket-now boasts almost 5,000 farmers markets. At the heart of it all is the famous Pike Place Market. On September 25th and 26th, Seattle will celebrate artisan food in the heart of our country’s oldest public market and a leading food trendsetter.

Pike Place Market FoundationThe Pike Place Market Artisan Food Festival is produced by The Market Foundation and is a benefit for the Pike Place Market’s human service agencies: Pike Market Medical Clinic, Child Care & Preschool, Senior Center and the Downtown Food Bank. More info can be found at www.artisanfoodfestival.org.

A summer update

We’re deep in the throes of summertime picnics, road-trips, time on the water, gardening, canning, and easy days with friends and family! Below are some great events and opportunities on the horizon – join us!

Pike Place Market Artisan Food Festival
Pike Place Market Artisan Food Festival10am – 6pm, Saturday, Sept. 25
10am – 5pm, Sunday, Sept. 26

The last quarter of the 20th Century has seen a craft food renaissance world wide. Slow Food, the powerful consumer movement founded in Italy as a counter to fast food, is said to be the biggest consumer based food movement in history. The U.S.-the country that invented the supermarket-now boasts almost 5,000 farmers markets. At the heart of it all is the famous Pike Place Market. On September 25th and 26th, Seattle will celebrate artisan food in the heart of our country’s oldest public market and a leading food trendsetter.

Slow Food Seattle will be there with some special guests for Q&A’s, book signings, and more! Join the celebration!

The Pike Place Market Artisan Food Festival is produced by The Market Foundation and is a benefit for the Pike Place Market’s human service agencies: Pike Market Medical Clinic, Child Care & Preschool, Senior Center and the Downtown Food Bank. More info can be found at www.artisanfoodfestival.org.

Dig In! Slow Food National Volunteer Day
Volunteers needed!

Slow Food Seattle is working with the Slow Food chapters locally and across the nation, to reach out to our communities and get some work done. This year we’ll be volunteering as part of the Pike Place Market Artisan Food Festival on September 25th and 26th (see next story for more on the festival). All proceeds from the festival benefit the programs of the Pike Place Market Foundation. Recruit your friends and family and enjoy the day together. Make a difference and have some fun!

Roles include helping with festival load-in, set-up, tear down, staffing the “Zucchini 500″ kids activity, and helping vendors as needed.

The first 50 people to register to volunteer will receive one of our spiffy new Slow Food Seattle aprons!

Contact Erika Sweet at the Pike Place Market Foundation to register and be sure to identify yourself as a Slow Food Seattle volunteer (to qualify for an apron)! erika.sweet@pikeplacemarket.org or 206.774.5254.

Seattle Chefs Collaborative
Urban Picnic 2010
Sunday, September 12, 2010

Eat it to save it!

Join Seattle Chefs Collaborative for a Sunday afternoon of fun and fantastic food on the rooftop deck at Rainier Square and help send local rising culinary stars to the Quillisascut Farm school in Rice, WA. Celebrated Seattle chefs will prepare another picnic to remember of culturally important Northwest foods from the Seattle Chefs Collaborative Urban Picnic 2010Renewing Americas Food Traditions (RAFT) list of endangered foods. As we like to say, ya gotta eat it to save it.

Participating chefs & restaurants include: John Sundstrom of Lark, Jason Franey of Canlis, Maria Hines of Tilth, Seth Caswell of emmer&rye, Ethan Stowell of Anchovies & Olives, Rachel Yang of Joule, Dan Braun of Oliver’s Twist, Karen Jurgensen of Quillisascut Farm, Riley Starks of Willows inn, Autumn Martin of Hot Cakes, and Tara Ayers of Ocho, one of the recipients of the 2010 Quillisascut scholarship.

Tickets $60 at Brown Paper Tickets
Children under 10 are free
www.brownpapertickets.com/event/121012

Urban Picnic is presented in partnership with Slow Food Seattle and Seattle CityClub. More info at Seattle Chefs Collaborative.

American Terroir: Savoring the Flavors of Our Woods, Waters and FieldsAn Edible Conversation with Rowan Jacobsen
author of American Terroir: Savoring the Flavors of Our Woods, Waters and Fields

September 21, 2010
7pm, The Palace Ballroom

2030 5th Ave. Seattle

Slow Food Seattle supporter discount – $10 off general admission
Promo code: slowterroir

James Beard award winning food writer Rowan Jacobsen discusses the role of the place in the taste of food in his new book American Terroir. He will be joined by Jill Lightner of Edible Seattle, Sharon Campbell of Tieton Cider Works and Harmony Orchard, Jon Rowley of Taylor Shellfish Farms and Greg Atkinson, author of The Northwest Essentials Cookbooks to discuss why delicious food is all about location, location, location. $25 ticket price includes panel discussion, appetizers, Theo chocolate and guided tasting of NW cider, apples and oysters.

Tickets $15/$25 at Brown Paper Tickets. Includes panel discussion, appetizers, Theo chocolate and guided tasting of NW cider, apples and oysters.

Use the promo code “slowterroir” to receive the $10 discount. More info can be found at www.kimricketts.com.

Kim Ricketts Book Events Edible Seattle Slow Food Seattle

Old-fashioned strawberry social – join us, July 7!

Anthony's HomePort Strawberry ShortcakeJoin Slow Food Seattle, Jon Rowley, Anthony’s Homeport, Edible Seattle, and Parfait Ice Cream for a taste of summer – and all things strawberry!

Strawberry shortcake, strawberry lemonade, strawberry ice cream, and a tasting of local strawberry varieties! There will even be a cash bar available with strawberry margaritas…

Strawberry growers Steve Schuh of Schuh Farms, Chris McKnight of Thulen Farms in the Skagit Valley, and Russ & Dan Picha from Picha Farms in the Puyallup Valley will attend the Strawberry Social and bring the strawberries that are still available to compare and be available to discuss strawberry growing and varieties in the Northwest.

Space is limited to 40 guests, please RSVP by Tuesday, July 6th to info@slowfoodseattle.org with your name and the names of those in your party. We’ll reply with a confirmation that you’re on the list as well as if we’re already at capacity.

Wednesday, July 7, 2010 – 5 to 7pm

Admission:
FREE for Slow Food members and all kids
$5/person for non-member adults
(all donations welcome, cash only at the door)

Location:
Anthony’s HomePort Shilshole Bay
6135 Seaview Ave. NW
Seattle, WA 98107

Savor Bristol Bay Week in Seattle: July 4-10

Bristol Bay fishing boat

Photo: Nick Hall

It’s almost summer time and with summer comes fresh wild salmon to restaurants, seafood markets and backyard BBQ’s! In the Pacific Northwest we are savvy to the fact that not all salmon taste the same. Depending on their species, what the fish were feeding on and the river run that the salmon are a part of each fish will vary slightly and have its own unique taste profile. This gives many reasons to serve a variety of sustainably caught wild salmon from the waters of Washington, Oregon and Alaska.

Slow Food Seattle is partnering with Trout Unlimited to celebrate our nation’s largest wild salmon fishery during Savor Bristol Bay Week: July 4-10.

Bristol Bay Salmon

Photo: Nick Hall

Bristol Bay’s salmon and story are coming back to the Northwest during the peak of the fishing season. Each day more chefs from our Slow Food Seattle Restaurants are saying “Yes” to featuring Bristol Bay salmon on their menus during Savor Bristol Bay Week. In the July Slow Food newsletter we’ll provide a list of places you can go to Vote with Your Fork” for Bristol Bay.

We are planning a number of events in the Seattle area so you can be a part of the celebration. Four events are planned for the Savor Bristol Bay week:

  • Tuesday, July 6 & Thursday, July 8 – Two free screenings of the award winning documentary RED GOLD at Roy Street Coffee, both showings will be at 7:30pm.
  • Wednesday, July 7 – Wild Salmon cooking class and dinner with Chef Becky Selengut at Edmonds PCC, 6:30pm to 9pm. Come Savor Bristol Bay and learn new ways to prepare Bristol Bay salmon at home as well as information about Bristol Bay’s salmon fishery and the things that make it so unique. (Tickets here; RSVP details on Facebook). On the menu: Quinoa cakes with wok-smoked king salmon and herbs; Bristol Bay salmon with watercress soup, chile oil and croutons; Slow cooked sockeye salmon with Columbia Valley red wine sauce and braised fennel.

Until July brings us the opening of Bristol Bay salmon season, you can learn more about this amazing place and wild salmon fishery from Trout Unlimited’s online sources:

  • WhyWild is part of Trout Unlimited’s Pacific Salmon Program with the purpose to educate and engage the salmon marketplace in Trout Unlimited’s wild salmon and steelhead conservation efforts from California through Alaska. From fish facts to what wine to serve when you “eat it to save it” you can find it all things wild salmon on this website!
  • Save Bristol Bay – This Trout Unlimited website will give you an overview of Bristol Bay – the place, the people, the environment and the issues – all presented with beautiful images that inspire and move you to learn more about the incredible Bristol Bay watershed and how to preserve it for future generation of both people and animals.

    Savor Bristol Bay
    BB Regional Seafood Development Association

    Trout Unlimited

Walnuts to Liqueur: Making Nocino with Chef Beth Maxey

Green Walnuts**This event has been rescheduled to July 31st, from 12:00-1:30**

Nocino is a traditional Italian liqueur made with green walnuts, spices and alcohol. It has a rich earthy flavor and is delicious as a digestive, over ice cream and as a reduction over duck breast…

Join Slow Food Seattle board member Chef Beth Maxey from 12:00 pm -1:30 pm on Saturday July 31st for a free hands-on Nocino making event in Volunteer Park and in an online community in the upcoming weeks as we share tips and forage for green walnuts (which are plentiful around the city).

Nocino making traditionally takes place during and after the festival of St. John the Baptist, where families and communities gather to feast and celebrate. Though we’re not celebrating a religious event, we’d love to preserve the conviviality of a community gathering. I’ll share my recipe from Italy as well as discuss regional variations and some of the technicalities of extractions. We’ll mix and mash nuts and flavorings and plan a follow-up tasting to see who really got it right. Also, since we will not add alcohol on site, only mash and mix the nuts, the event is appropriate (and fun) for kids too.

Follow us on Facebook? Here’s the event to RSVP and invite your friends. Follow the discussion here:
http://www.facebook.com/topic.php?uid=71899262386&topic=15380

Below are instructions and guidelines for foraging and sourcing your own green walnuts, which are abundant around Seattle. You are still welcome at the event if you cannot find any but we encourage you to try.

Vintage Nocino AdPlease reply to beth@slowfoodseattle.org to let us know you’re participating so we can accommodate everyone with interest and share foraging and Nocino making tips with you even if you cannot make the event.

A brief list of supplies and exact location will be sent to email responders before the event.

Foraging Instructions:

There are two types of edible walnuts. Black or English and Persian. Both can be found around the city. The following links provide a picture of leaves of each tree for your identification.

Green walnuts can be hard to see. I have found most trees by noticing the shells from last year’s crop on the ground. Ask around, though, and you will most likely find one.

Green walnuts are ready when you can insert a strait pin in them easily. If you find walnuts at this stage you can pick them and keep them in your refrigerator.

Be careful when picking as the walnuts and branches secrete a milky sap that will oxidize and stain your skin a deep brown. I suggest using gloves and protecting all surfaces they might come in contact with.

If you cannot find any walnuts, try the farmer’s market. They are a bit of a rare items but often if you ask farmer’s will pick them for you.

Squirrels are quite fond of green walnuts; try and beat them to it.

If you find a good tree, especially one on public land, let us know.

Black Walnut Leaves:
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/ext/senior/fruits/blackwalnut5.htm

Persian Walnut (also known as English Walnut) Leaves:
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/ext/senior/fruits/walnute5.htm

Nocino-making

Terra Madre 2010: Apply by May 15th

Terra MadreEvery two years, Slow Food International hosts Terra Madre – a unique conference, in Torino, Italy. This year, Terra Madre will be held October 21 – 25, 2010. It is an international forum that gathers sustainable food producers, farmers, cooks, educators and activists from around the world to share their stories and traditions, as well as their innovative solutions for keeping small-scale agriculture and sustainable food production alive and well. The delegate application period is now open, and all of the application information is below.

The Slow Food Seattle community has an abundance of eligible and qualified people in each of the categories: sustainable food producers, farmers, cooks, educators, and activists. The activist category is new this year, and encourages a wide variety of committed people to apply. Slow Food USA wants to select a delegation with a diverse set of interests and experience. Note the section below outlining what they term “food communities” who might apply as a complete unit.

Terra Madre - Torino, ItalySlow Food Seattle sent two delegates in 2008: graduate student and now Slow Food Seattle board member, Arwen Kimmel and board member and seafood/fishing advocate, Amy Grondin. Our chapter raised money to help Arwen offset her airfare, and they both returned to share this tremendous experience with our members.

Terra Madre was a once in a lifetime experience for me personally and professionally. As a graduate student I made invaluable contacts and collected in both the Earth Workshops and from Presidia Vendors that have helped to frame my dissertation work in chocolate and coffee. Personally I made friends I think I will have forever, ate food that was life-changing and gained an even greater appreciation for Slow Food and its goals.

- Arwen Kimmel

Delegates are chosen from all over the world. Slow Food International provides accommodations, meals, and local transportation. Observers, who must also apply, may attend any conference event, but must provide their own accommodations, food, and local transportation.

Good. Clean. and Fair.

The Salone del Gusto – the world’s largest artisan food marketplace – is held concurrently, in part for delegates to gain a deeper sense of how small-scale sustainable producers can market their products effectively.

We urge anyone motivated to join the world community in finding ways to make the food system better to consider applying. If you have any questions about Terra Madre, or the application process, please send them to terramadre@slowfoodusa.org or info@slowfoodseattle.org.

Details from Slow Food USA:

What is Terra Madre?
This is the fourth edition of the conference, held biennially in Torino. It was started for small-scale sustainable food producers from across the world – currently 150 countries – to talk about sustainable production and inspire each other and share best practices.  It now brings together people from all the links in the chain – farmers, educators, cooks, activists, students.
This year, the conference will be smaller by 25% across the board (not just the US delegation). Even with the size reduction, it is still a very large conference, with thousands of people in attendance.

What it means to be a delegate:
Paid conference attendance, housing and food and ground transport in Italy (paid by Slow Food International). Delegates are responsible for US ground transport and round-trip airfare to/from Italy.

What we’re looking for:
Food producers, educators, activists, cooks, students – people who will bring diverse experiences to share and who want to bring their experience back home.  In particular: people who have never been before.

Bringing Terra Madre home:
We know some of you have expressed disappointment when delegates have attended but not connected with their Slow Food community back home. We’re always looking for ideas on how to help those connections happen. For example, if you are helping to fund someone go to Terra Madre, it is reasonable to ask them to come back and give a talk to your chapter.

To download Arwen Kimmel’s PPT presentation that she shared after returning from Terra Madre 2008, click here. (PDF – 28MB)

New people:
We are eager to bring new people to the event so the maximum number of people have a chance to experience what Terra Madre has to offer.

How to apply:
To be considered, applicants must be at least 18 years of age, and a food producer (e.g., farmers, fisher-people, wild food gatherers, etc.), cook, educator, student or activist.

You must complete and submit both parts of the application by May 15th (postmark date for the mailed portion). We will let you know the results of the application process by June 15th, 2010. We will contact you when we have received both parts of the application.

U.S. delegates pay for their own air travel to and from Italy, and ground travel in the U.S. Acceptance as a delegate includes conference attendance, in-country travel and meals, and housing for the duration of the event (an approximate value of $1,500). Please note that delegate housing is available only for delegates, and not for spouses or family members.

We encourage you to apply in a group as a food community:

  1. Geographic community: e.g. several different types of food producers who sell at the same farmers market could apply as the Ann Arbor Farmers Market food community; a chef and some of the food producers who supply to her restaurant could apply together as the Raleigh Growers and Chefs.
  2. Shared Production community: e.g. Gravenstein Apple Growers or American Raw Milk Cheese producers.

Representing yourself/selves as a food community is a wonderful way to demonstrate the ways in which different links in a production chain work together.

Application, Part 1:
Part one of the application is here: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/NJBRQ86 It should take no more than ten minutes to complete. If you are unable to fill this out online, please contact the Slow Food USA office at terramadre@slowfoodusa.org.

Application, Part 2:
Once you have completed part one, you can use part two of the application to be creative, and share your work. Please send in part two via regular mail:

c/o Terra Madre Coordinator
Slow Food USA
20 Jay St, Suite M04
Brooklyn, NY 11201

Please answer all of the below questions that are applicable. Feel free to cut and paste language from a current source, such as your farm/restaurant/program website. Creativity is encouraged!

There is a minimum word count of 400 words (no maximum). The more you tell us, the more information we will have to make our decision.

Food producer: please describe your farm, facility, etc. Describe the guiding philosophy; growing practices; certification; labor practices, and anything else you think is important for us to know.

Cook: please describe the role you play at your establishment. Please describe your food philosophy, sourcing practices, how you work with (or would like to work with) producers, and anything else you would like us to know.

Educator: please describe the program you lead or work for. What is its guiding philosophy, structure, pedagogy?

Activist: please describe your organization or project, your role there, and your goals (both organizational and personal).

For all applicants:

  1. Include pictures of you, your farm, your restaurant, your school garden, your project, your food festival.
  2. Feel free to include testimonials from your students, employees, customers, etc.
  3. Please let us know if you are connected to the local Slow Food chapter in your community. If so, which one? How?
  4. Why do you want to come to Terra Madre?
  5. How do you intend to “bring Terra Madre home” to your community?

For more information, check out the U.S. Terra Madre Network portion of our web site.

Terra Madre