Next Slow Food Seattle Book Club Meeting: Oct 17 – “THE GOOD FOOD REVOLUTION” by Will Allen

Will AllenWe are still finalizing location details, but wanted to give you all an early heads-up to give you plenty of time to read this great next selection for our Slow Food Seattle Book Club.

Will Allen’s autobiography, THE GOOD FOOD REVOLUTION, was just published in paperback. He’s coming to Seattle to speak at the Seattle Public Library Microsoft Auditorium on 11/20 and then as the key speaker at the Snohomish County Focus on Farming conference on 11/21. So it seems like a perfect time to read his book!

We will meet from 6:30-8pm. The book club is always free to attend and is open to members and non-members. It’s a fun, casual, welcoming group of folks who love good food and good books. We’d love to see you there!

We’ll either be meeting in Capitol Hill or the Roosevelt area, and we’ll have more details on this ASAP.

You can RSVP on our Facebook page. If you’re not on Facebook, feel free to email Leslie Seaton with your RSVP or any questions.

Here’s the blurb on the book:

A pioneering urban farmer and MacArthur Genius Award-Winner points the way to building a new food system that can feed- and heal- communities.

The son of a sharecropper, Will Allen had no intention of ever becoming a farmer himself. But after years in professional basketball and as an executive for Kentucky Fried Chicken and Procter & Gamble, he cashed in his retirement fund for a two-acre plot just outside Milwaukee’s largest public housing project. The area was a food desert with only convenience stores and fast-food restaurants to serve the needs of locals.

Despite financial challenges and daunting odds, Allen built the country’s preeminent urban farm-a food and educational center that now produces enough produce and fish year-round to feed thousands. Employing young people from the neighboring housing project and community, Growing Power shows how local food systems can help troubled youths, dismantle racism, create jobs, bring urban and rural communities closer together, and improve public health. Today, Allen’s organization helps develop community food systems across the country.

An eco-classic in the making, The Good Food Revolution is the story of Will’s personal journey, the lives he has touched, and a grassroots movement that is changing the way our nation eats.

SFS Books: May 10th – Poisoned: The True Story of the Deadly E. Coli Outbreak That Changed the Way Americans Eat

 

Poisoned: The True Story of the Deadly E. Coli Outbreak That Changed the Way Americans Eat Our May book club selection is Poisoned: The True Story of the Deadly E. Coli Outbreak That Changed the Way Americans Eat by Jeff Benedict

This will be an active, open conversation and all are welcome – please come even if you haven’t had a chance to finish the book! We’ll be meeting from 6-7:30 p.m. on Thursday, May 10th. Roy Street Coffee and Tea is located at 700 Broadway East. Limited free parking is available in the lot below.

Interested in food safety? Curious about how the common, yet sometimes deadly E. coli bacteria shows up not only in ground meat, but also strawberries, spinach and sprouts?

Join the Slow Food Seattle Book Club for a discussion of Jeff Benedict’s Poisoned: The True Story of the Deadly E. Coli Outbreak That Changed the Way Americans Eat. Benedict tells the story of the 1993 E. coli break-out in Jack in the Box hamburger meat through main characters nine-year old Brianne, who came close to dying and still lives with the impact of the episode, and Bainbridge Island-based lawyer, Bill Marler, who took on her case as a young lawyer.

“Over a period of a few weeks, more than 700 cases scattered across four Western states; four children died gruesomely, with bleeding intestines and kidney failure. But Mr. Benedict, a lawyer turned journalist, pays relatively little attention to the story’s medical complexities; his focus is the gruesome and complicated legal tangle that ensued. Nowadays we are all too familiar with the practices of giant processing plants, but back in those innocent times it was all new and appalling — the poorly regulated slaughterhouses, the batching of meat for grinding, the wide distribution of product, which maximized the spread of any contaminant.” — Abigail Zuger, M.D., New York Times, June 27, 2011

Jeff Benedict and Bill Marler

Author, Jeff Benedict (left) and attorney, Bill Marler (right). Photo: WSU Photo Services

Poisoned is as relevant today as it is to the 1993 story it tells. Just months after the book’s 2011 publication, another E. coli outbreak, this time in Germany, was traced back to salad vegetables.

“Although much more is known about food safety now than in 1993, the book speaks to our times. Earlier this month, the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced that six more strains of E. coli will be banned from ground beef. That move follows pressure from Marler and represents a step forward in the fight for safe food, which is what “Poisoned” is all about.” — Lynne Terry, The Oregonian, September 24, 2011

Please join us! If you haven’t had a chance to read the book, find an excerpt here: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/28/health/28excerpt.html?_r=1&ref=views#

RSVP to books@slowfoodseattle.org and/or on the Facebook event page

About Jeff Benedict
Jeff Benedict is a contributor for Sports Illustrated and a writer for SI.com.  In 2011 he launched Inspire Books, his own book publishing imprint.  He published Poisoned: The True Story of the Deadly E. coli Outbreak that Changed the way Americans Eat under the new imprint.  Poisoned is Benedict’s tenth book and critics consider it his best.  The New York Times called it “the full literary experience of a medico-legal thriller in a work of nonfiction.”

Benedict was born in 1966 in New London, Connecticut. He has a Bachelor’s in History from Eastern Connecticut State University, a Master’s in Political Science from Northeastern University, and a J.D. from the New England School of Law. He previously practiced law in Connecticut, where he has spent most of his life. Today he lives in Virginia where he teaches Writing and Mass Media at Southern Virginia University and lives on a Civil War-era farm with his wife and best friend Lydia Benedict and their four children. http://www.jeffbenedict.com

My fish has issues; it’s complicated – Sustainable Seafood in a Multimedia World

By Amy Grondin

My Fish has Issues; it's complicated - Sustainable Seafood in a Multimedia WorldJoin Slow Food Seattle for My fish has issues; it’s complicated – Sustainable Seafood in a Multimedia World, a conversation with Chefs Barton Seaver and Becky Selengut at the Broadway Performance Hall on Monday October 17th from 6:30pm to 8pm. A cookbook signing and reception featuring Snoqualmie Vineyards, The Pike Brewing Company, and an oyster bar from Taylor Shellfish will follow from 8pm to 8:45pm. Tickets available now through Brown Paper Tickets, $12/pp.

It’s time to cut through the fog of confusion that surrounds choosing and eating seafood. Sustainable seafood can be enjoyed in such a way that our personal health and the health of the oceans are of equal consideration. There are lots of sustainable seafood options to be had but how do we identify them?

Becky Selengut and Barton Seaver

Becky Selengut and Barton Seaver

East coast meets West coast for this fun and informative sustainable seafood presentation with Becky Selengut, our own local fish whisperer, and Barton Seaver, who’s visiting from D.C. While cooking is a hands on activity that engages all your senses, these two chefs have also engaged their minds and ethics in the process without finger pointing at those of us who are still learning about sustainable seafood. We can benefit from their research and hours in the kitchen by reading the sustainable seafood cookbooks each chef released in Spring of 2011

The evening’s conversation will appeal to folks who receive their information in many different ways, from slow as the printed word to speedy as devices can deliver. As part of the presentation our chefs, led by edibleSEATTLE editor Jill Lightner, will talk about how technology allows them to engage with eaters who may be new to seafood and not necessarily cookbook readers who specifically sought out a sustainable seafood book. Love your smartphone? Smart and sassy blog and Facebook posts, Tweets, websites and YouTube videos by Becky and Barton are just a click away.

Or perhaps you would rather meander printed pages that are glossy with images of seafood briny and sweet from the ocean? A person can pick up either chefs’ cookbook and get the full story – recipes with a dash of science sprinkled in as seasoning. Pick up your copy of For Cod & Country, Barton’s cookbook or Good Fish, Becky’s cookbook after the presentation.

Good Fish   For Cod & Country

What might you learn from our chefs? Both Becky and Barton encourage us to eat a variety of fish besides the perennial favorites of shrimp, salmon and tuna.

Eating a variety of seafood protects the health of humans and fish populations. Creating a marketplace demand for many types of fish eases the pressure on the whole ocean food web by spreading harvest efforts over many species and not over fishing a one popular fish.

An example? Small silver fish – once popular, then over fished due to market demand but on the rise again – just might make it back to everyone’s dinner plate as Barton and Becky’s followers learn from reading a computer screen or a cookbook page about recipes that balance the fishes intense flavor so the rich, nutritional qualities of these environmentally friendly fish are enjoyed.

And in or out of a tin, we need to get over our national suspicion of small silver fish; they are delicious, not scary! Join us on Monday October 17th and we’ll talk about it.

Speakers:

Thanks to our event sponsor, Seafood Producers Cooperative for their generous support and also to our presenting partners: Readers to EatersSnoqualmie Vineyards, Pike Brewing Company, Taylor Shellfish, and edibleSeattle.

Seafood Producers Cooperative   Readers to EatersEdible Seattle

Snoqualmie Winery    Pike Place Brewery  Taylor Shellfish

Slow Food Seattle Books: September 8 – Food for All: Fixing School Food in America by Janet Poppendieck

Food for All: Fixing School Food in AmericaOur September book club selection is Food for All: Fixing School Food in America by Janet Poppendieck. RSVP on Facebook too!

We’ll be meeting from 6-7:30 p.m. on Thursday, September 8th. Roy Street Coffee and Tea is located at 700 Broadway East. Limited free parking is available in the lot below. This will be an active, open conversation and all are welcome – please come even if you haven’t had a chance to finish the book!

How did our children end up eating nachos, pizza, and tater tots for lunch? Taking us on an eye-opening journey into the nation’s school kitchens, this superbly researched book is the first to provide a comprehensive assessment of school food in the United States. Janet Poppendieck explores the deep politics of food provision from multiple perspectives–history, policy, nutrition, environmental sustainability, taste, and more.

Drawing from extensive interviews with officials, workers, students, and activists, she discusses the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs and turns a critical eye on the “competitive foods” sold in cafeterias. How did we get into the absurd situation in which nutritionally regulated meals compete with fast food items and snack foods loaded with sugar, salt, and fat? What is the nutritional profile of the federal meals? How well are they reaching students who need them?

Opening a window onto our culture as a whole, Poppendieck reveals the forces–the financial troubles of schools, the commercialization of childhood, the reliance on market models–that are determining how lunch is served. She concludes with a sweeping vision for change: fresh, healthy food for all children as a regular part of their school day.

Janet Poppendieck

Janet Poppendieck

Janet Poppendieck is Professor of Sociology at Hunter College, City University of New York. She is the author of Free for All: Fixing School Food in America; (University of California Press, 2010); Sweet Charity? Emergency Food and the End of Entitlement (Penguin, 1999); and Breadlines Knee Deep in Wheat: Food Assistance in the Great Depression (Rutgers University Press, 1985).

“In her extraordinarily well-thought-out, beautifully written, sympathetic, and compelling book, Jan Poppendieck makes clear that Free for All has two meanings: how pressures to reduce the cost of school meals put our children’s health at risk, and how best to solve this problem–universal school meals. Anyone who reads this book will find the present school lunch situation beyond unacceptable. Free for All is a call for action on behalf of America’s school kids, one that we all need to join. I will be using this book in all my classes.”–Marion Nestle, author of Food Politics

Hunt, Gather, Cook: Finding the Forgotten Feast with Hank Shaw on July 28

Hank Shaw

Hank Shaw, author of "Hunt, Gather, Cook: Finding the Forgotten Feast"

The Pacific Northwest has a rich bounty of flora and fauna to offer from land, sky, and sea. Foraging, gleaning, hunting, fishing, crabbing, clamming… not just for the hardcore outdoorsy-crowd anymore. Join us on Thursday, July 28th at 6pm, for an evening with Hank Shaw, author of Hunt, Gather, Cook: Finding the Forgotten Feast. Hank will share his adventures in the field and in the kitchen with a talk on wild foods and book signing. Special guest, Chef Robin Leventhal (formerly of Crave & Top Chef), will also be on hand, serving up some delicious appetizers inspired by Hunt, Gather, Cook. Kevin Cedergreen of Cedergreen Cellars, Cole Sisson of Hestia Cellars, Melissa Peterman of Elsom Cellars, and the fine folks from McCrea Cellars will be pouring some fantastic Washington wines.

RSVP on Facebook too!

When: Thursday, July 28th at 6pm

Where: Wine World, 400 NE 45th St. Seattle, 98105

Tickets: $15/person (includes wild foods talk by Hank Shaw, wine tasting, and appetizers).

Brown Paper Tickets

Readers to Eaters will have Hunt, Gather, Cook available for purchase and Hank will be signing copies at the event.

Co-sponsored by: Slow Food Seattle, Readers to Eaters, and Wine World.

For a review of Hunt, Gather, Cook by Seattle Weekly’s Voracious contributor, Sonja Groset, check here.

For Hank’s perspective on the book, check out this post.

About Hank Shaw:
Hank Shaw is a New Jersey native who worked as a political reporter for various newspapers for 18 years until becoming a full-time food writer, outdoorsman and cook in 2010. A forager and angler since he could walk, Hank began hunting in 2002 and has never looked back. He hunts or fishes for all the meat he eats at home, and foraged foods form a daily part of his diet. Hank runs the wild foods blog Hunter Angler Gardener Cook, which has twice been nominated for a James Beard Award. He won the International Association of Culinary Professionals award for Best Blog in 2010 and 2011, and his magazine writing has appeared in Food & Wine, Organic Gardening, Field & Stream, as well as many other publications.

Hunt Gather CookAbout Hunt, Gather, Cook: Finding the Forgotten Feast:
If there is a frontier beyond organic, local, and seasonal, beyond farmers’ markets and sustainably
raised meat, it surely includes hunting, fishing, and foraging your own food. A lifelong angler and forager who became a hunter late in life, Hank Shaw has chronicled his passion for hunting and gathering in his widely read blog, Hunter Angler Gardener Cook, which has developed an avid following among outdoor people and foodies alike. Hank is dedicated to finding a place on the table for the myriad overlooked and underutilized wild foods that are there for the taking if you know how to get them.

In Hunt, Gather, Cook, he shares his experiences both in the field and the kitchen, as well as his extensive knowledge of North America’s edible flora and fauna. With the fresh, clever prose that brings so many readers to his blog, Hank provides a user-friendly, food-oriented introduction to tracking down everything from sassafras to striped bass to snowshoe hares. He then provides innovative ways to prepare wild foods that go far beyond typical campfire cuisine: homemade root beer, cured wild boar loin, boneless tempura shad, Sardinian hare stew, even pasta made with handmade acorn flour.

Thanks to our co-sponsors:

Wine World Warehouse      Readers to Eaters

Special thanks to our wine sponsors:

 Hestia CellarsCedergreen Cellars  Elsom Cellars        McCrea Cellars

Slow Food Seattle Books: July 14 – The Unprejudiced Palate by Angelo Pellegrini

Angelo Pellegrini

Angelo Pellegrini: Slow Food, before Slow Food existed

Join us for our next book club selection on Thursday, July 14th, the classic - The Unprejudiced Palate: Classic Thoughts on Food and the Good Life by Seattle’s own Angelo Pellegrini.

Join us! This will be an active, open conversation and all are welcome – please come even if you haven’t had a chance to finish the book! We’ll be meeting from 6-7:30 p.m. on Thursday, July 14th. Roy Street Coffee and Tea is located at 700 Broadway East. Limited free parking is available in the lot below.  RSVP on Facebook too!

From the publisher:
“First issued in 1948, when soulless minute steaks and quick casseroles were becoming the norm, The Unprejudiced Palate inspired a seismic culinary shift in how America eats. Written by a food-loving immigrant from Tuscany, this memoir-cum-cookbook articulates the Italian American vision of the good life: a backyard garden, a well-cooked meal shared with family and friends, and a passion for ingredients and cooking that nourish the body and the soul.”

The Unprejudiced Palate“I have always thought that Angelo Pellegrini misnamed his charming but opinionated book. It should have been called the Prejudiced Palate, because he is so absolutely sure and unwavering in his vision of how to live a beautiful and delicious life. And I think he’s right.”
–Alice Waters, Owner, Chez Panisse

“Like great dishes, great writing remains in our memory forever. Angelo Pellegrini’s THE UNPREJUDICED PALATE is a lesson in how to enjoy life in an elegant and highly civilized way.”
– Jacques Pépin

“THE UNPREJUDICED PALATE is a forgotten gem from what might be remembered as the Golden Age of American food writing. This Italian born, beloved Seattle professor, friend and colleague of MFK Fisher, wrote with charm, wit, and a rare intelligence about food.”
–Mark Kurlansky, author of Salt, Cod, 1968

Resources: