My fish has issues; it’s complicated – Sustainable Seafood in a Multimedia World

By Amy Grondin

My Fish has Issues; it's complicated - Sustainable Seafood in a Multimedia WorldJoin Slow Food Seattle for My fish has issues; it’s complicated – Sustainable Seafood in a Multimedia World, a conversation with Chefs Barton Seaver and Becky Selengut at the Broadway Performance Hall on Monday October 17th from 6:30pm to 8pm. A cookbook signing and reception featuring Snoqualmie Vineyards, The Pike Brewing Company, and an oyster bar from Taylor Shellfish will follow from 8pm to 8:45pm. Tickets available now through Brown Paper Tickets, $12/pp.

It’s time to cut through the fog of confusion that surrounds choosing and eating seafood. Sustainable seafood can be enjoyed in such a way that our personal health and the health of the oceans are of equal consideration. There are lots of sustainable seafood options to be had but how do we identify them?

Becky Selengut and Barton Seaver

Becky Selengut and Barton Seaver

East coast meets West coast for this fun and informative sustainable seafood presentation with Becky Selengut, our own local fish whisperer, and Barton Seaver, who’s visiting from D.C. While cooking is a hands on activity that engages all your senses, these two chefs have also engaged their minds and ethics in the process without finger pointing at those of us who are still learning about sustainable seafood. We can benefit from their research and hours in the kitchen by reading the sustainable seafood cookbooks each chef released in Spring of 2011

The evening’s conversation will appeal to folks who receive their information in many different ways, from slow as the printed word to speedy as devices can deliver. As part of the presentation our chefs, led by edibleSEATTLE editor Jill Lightner, will talk about how technology allows them to engage with eaters who may be new to seafood and not necessarily cookbook readers who specifically sought out a sustainable seafood book. Love your smartphone? Smart and sassy blog and Facebook posts, Tweets, websites and YouTube videos by Becky and Barton are just a click away.

Or perhaps you would rather meander printed pages that are glossy with images of seafood briny and sweet from the ocean? A person can pick up either chefs’ cookbook and get the full story – recipes with a dash of science sprinkled in as seasoning. Pick up your copy of For Cod & Country, Barton’s cookbook or Good Fish, Becky’s cookbook after the presentation.

Good Fish   For Cod & Country

What might you learn from our chefs? Both Becky and Barton encourage us to eat a variety of fish besides the perennial favorites of shrimp, salmon and tuna.

Eating a variety of seafood protects the health of humans and fish populations. Creating a marketplace demand for many types of fish eases the pressure on the whole ocean food web by spreading harvest efforts over many species and not over fishing a one popular fish.

An example? Small silver fish – once popular, then over fished due to market demand but on the rise again – just might make it back to everyone’s dinner plate as Barton and Becky’s followers learn from reading a computer screen or a cookbook page about recipes that balance the fishes intense flavor so the rich, nutritional qualities of these environmentally friendly fish are enjoyed.

And in or out of a tin, we need to get over our national suspicion of small silver fish; they are delicious, not scary! Join us on Monday October 17th and we’ll talk about it.

Speakers:

Thanks to our event sponsor, Seafood Producers Cooperative for their generous support and also to our presenting partners: Readers to EatersSnoqualmie Vineyards, Pike Brewing Company, Taylor Shellfish, and edibleSeattle.

Seafood Producers Cooperative   Readers to EatersEdible Seattle

Snoqualmie Winery    Pike Place Brewery  Taylor Shellfish

Volunteers still needed – this Saturday, May 28th, 10am-2pm!

Join us for an afternoon of habitat restoration at Full Circle Farm led by Stewardship Partners on Saturday, May 28th on the banks of Griffin Creek and the Snoqualmie River. Do your part to save wild salmon by restoring a stretch of water essential to salmon spawning success. It is your choice whether wield a shovel or a camera. All levels of activity and support are welcome. Co-Sponsors for the work party are: Edible Seattle, Full Circle Farm, and Stewardship Partners.

Contact Alex Ko from Stewardship Partners today to RSVP at 206.292.9875.

 

The trail building is from 10am-2pm at Full Circle Farm in Carnation. Please try to arrive promptly at ten or slightly before, as the trail is about 2/3 of a mile from the parking lot, and we have a tractor taking volunteers out on the dot. Feel free to bring friends and family! There will be pastries and donuts, generously donated by Grateful Bread bakery of Seattle, and coffee provided by Starbucks.

A few things to remember:

  • It is the Pacific NW so dress in layers, bring raingear, gloves and wear sturdy shoes or boots
  • Bring your own snacks and water
  • You will be outside and ‘facilities’ may be limited
  • Come ready to work but be mindful of your own limitations. Please don’t overdo it.

Driving directions from Seattle:

  • Take 1-90E
  • Take exit 22 towards Preston/Fall City
  • Turn left at SE 82nd St
  • Turn right at SE High Point Way/Preston Fall City Rd SE
  • Continue to follow Preston Fall City Rd SE
  • Turn Right at WA-202 E/SE Redmond Fall City Rd/River St
  • At the traffic circle, take the 2nd exit onto WA-203 N/Fall City Carnation Rd SE
  • Turn left at NE 8th St
  • Drive to small white house and park in lot

Share on Facebook too: RSVP on Facebook too!

To read more about wild salmon habitat, check out the story in the May/June edition of Edible Seattle.

Nominee for Slow Food USA’s Ark of Taste: The Sugar Hubbard Squash

Slow Food’s Ark of Taste aims to rediscover, describe and publicize forgotten flavors around the world. Through the Ark of Taste program, Slow Food USA has a catalog of over 200 delicious foods in danger of extinction. Since 1996, more than 800 products from over 50 countries have been added to the international Ark of Taste. By promoting and eating Ark products we help ensure that they remain in production and on our plates.

The mission of the Slow Food Ark of Taste is to preserve traditional tastes and to celebrate them, by introducing them to the Slow Food membership and then to the world. All of the foods on the Ark of Taste are heritage products that have real economic viability and commercial potential for the communities that grow, produce or harvest them.

Since it’s inception, Slow Food Seattle has successfully boarded four regional food products onto the Slow Food Ark of Taste including Olympia Oyster, Marbled Chinook Salmon, Geoduck, and Makah Ozette Potato (our only Presidium product). Slow Food Seattle’s latest Ark of Taste nomination is the Sugar Hubbard, a sweet heirloom winter squash with a unique Puget Sound heritage. Former Slow Food Seattle Co-Chair, and Puget Sound Food Network Project Manager, Lucy Norris, recently wrote about this important heirloom in the winter 2010 issue of Edible Seattle.

Read the full story in Edible Seattle, or download a PDF version.

Sugar Hubbard Squash

The Sugar Hubbard Squash, grown at Sherman's Pioneer Farm Produce in central Whidbey Island, is Slow Food Seattle's latest nomination for the Ark of Taste.

Sherman’s Pioneer Farm Produce in central Whidbey Island grows the only commercial crop of Sugar Hubbard in the country. It is the result of combining traditional blue Hubbard and Sweetmeat squash, inheriting the best flavor and texture characteristics of both. The Sugar Hubbard is a nutrient dense, starchy squash (with a high glycemic index), but also very high in vitamin A, exceeding USDA requirements for Beta Carotene. Most winter squash varieties are interchangeable in recipes, and the Sugar Hubbard is nutty-sweet and the colored deep orange like a marigold. Try it in a favorite recipe that calls for winter squash, and you’ll be impressed.

The Sugar Hubbard has an excellent flavor, and it’s uniquely local to Puget Sound, with a strong family heritage. It has every asset required for boarding onto Slow Food’s Ark of Taste. Slow Food Seattle’s interest in boarding this product on the Ark of Taste will send a signal to conscientious consumers and help boost market demand in our area. Voting with your fork helps food producers like the Sherman’s remain profitable in the business of farming in our region. Only the best tasting endangered foods make it onto the Ark, and we think the Sugar Hubbard is a great fit.

Find the Squash
Peeled squash cubes are available at all Whole Foods locations in Oregon and Washington as long as the supply holds out. Liz and Dale continue to look for additional retailers for their squash. Sherman’s Pioneer Farm Produce is located at 46 South Ebey Road, Coupeville, WA. Contact Liz or Dale Sherman at 360.678.4675.

Looking for recipes?
Spice Loaf – by Editor, Edible Seattle
Chili Stew – by Lucy Norris, adapted from an original recipe by Liz Sherman

Excerpts with permission from Edible Seattle.

Dale Sherman in his field of Sugar Hubbard Squash

Dale Sherman in his field of Sugar Hubbard squash. Photo: Lara Ferroni

Lucy Norris is Project Manager for Puget Sound Food Network, a project of the Northwest Agriculture Business Center, former co-chair of Slow Food Seattle, and author of Pickled: Preserving a World of Tastes and Traditions.

A summer update

We’re deep in the throes of summertime picnics, road-trips, time on the water, gardening, canning, and easy days with friends and family! Below are some great events and opportunities on the horizon – join us!

Pike Place Market Artisan Food Festival
Pike Place Market Artisan Food Festival10am – 6pm, Saturday, Sept. 25
10am – 5pm, Sunday, Sept. 26

The last quarter of the 20th Century has seen a craft food renaissance world wide. Slow Food, the powerful consumer movement founded in Italy as a counter to fast food, is said to be the biggest consumer based food movement in history. The U.S.-the country that invented the supermarket-now boasts almost 5,000 farmers markets. At the heart of it all is the famous Pike Place Market. On September 25th and 26th, Seattle will celebrate artisan food in the heart of our country’s oldest public market and a leading food trendsetter.

Slow Food Seattle will be there with some special guests for Q&A’s, book signings, and more! Join the celebration!

The Pike Place Market Artisan Food Festival is produced by The Market Foundation and is a benefit for the Pike Place Market’s human service agencies: Pike Market Medical Clinic, Child Care & Preschool, Senior Center and the Downtown Food Bank. More info can be found at www.artisanfoodfestival.org.

Dig In! Slow Food National Volunteer Day
Volunteers needed!

Slow Food Seattle is working with the Slow Food chapters locally and across the nation, to reach out to our communities and get some work done. This year we’ll be volunteering as part of the Pike Place Market Artisan Food Festival on September 25th and 26th (see next story for more on the festival). All proceeds from the festival benefit the programs of the Pike Place Market Foundation. Recruit your friends and family and enjoy the day together. Make a difference and have some fun!

Roles include helping with festival load-in, set-up, tear down, staffing the “Zucchini 500″ kids activity, and helping vendors as needed.

The first 50 people to register to volunteer will receive one of our spiffy new Slow Food Seattle aprons!

Contact Erika Sweet at the Pike Place Market Foundation to register and be sure to identify yourself as a Slow Food Seattle volunteer (to qualify for an apron)! erika.sweet@pikeplacemarket.org or 206.774.5254.

Seattle Chefs Collaborative
Urban Picnic 2010
Sunday, September 12, 2010

Eat it to save it!

Join Seattle Chefs Collaborative for a Sunday afternoon of fun and fantastic food on the rooftop deck at Rainier Square and help send local rising culinary stars to the Quillisascut Farm school in Rice, WA. Celebrated Seattle chefs will prepare another picnic to remember of culturally important Northwest foods from the Seattle Chefs Collaborative Urban Picnic 2010Renewing Americas Food Traditions (RAFT) list of endangered foods. As we like to say, ya gotta eat it to save it.

Participating chefs & restaurants include: John Sundstrom of Lark, Jason Franey of Canlis, Maria Hines of Tilth, Seth Caswell of emmer&rye, Ethan Stowell of Anchovies & Olives, Rachel Yang of Joule, Dan Braun of Oliver’s Twist, Karen Jurgensen of Quillisascut Farm, Riley Starks of Willows inn, Autumn Martin of Hot Cakes, and Tara Ayers of Ocho, one of the recipients of the 2010 Quillisascut scholarship.

Tickets $60 at Brown Paper Tickets
Children under 10 are free
www.brownpapertickets.com/event/121012

Urban Picnic is presented in partnership with Slow Food Seattle and Seattle CityClub. More info at Seattle Chefs Collaborative.

American Terroir: Savoring the Flavors of Our Woods, Waters and FieldsAn Edible Conversation with Rowan Jacobsen
author of American Terroir: Savoring the Flavors of Our Woods, Waters and Fields

September 21, 2010
7pm, The Palace Ballroom

2030 5th Ave. Seattle

Slow Food Seattle supporter discount – $10 off general admission
Promo code: slowterroir

James Beard award winning food writer Rowan Jacobsen discusses the role of the place in the taste of food in his new book American Terroir. He will be joined by Jill Lightner of Edible Seattle, Sharon Campbell of Tieton Cider Works and Harmony Orchard, Jon Rowley of Taylor Shellfish Farms and Greg Atkinson, author of The Northwest Essentials Cookbooks to discuss why delicious food is all about location, location, location. $25 ticket price includes panel discussion, appetizers, Theo chocolate and guided tasting of NW cider, apples and oysters.

Tickets $15/$25 at Brown Paper Tickets. Includes panel discussion, appetizers, Theo chocolate and guided tasting of NW cider, apples and oysters.

Use the promo code “slowterroir” to receive the $10 discount. More info can be found at www.kimricketts.com.

Kim Ricketts Book Events Edible Seattle Slow Food Seattle

Old-fashioned strawberry social – join us, July 7!

Anthony's HomePort Strawberry ShortcakeJoin Slow Food Seattle, Jon Rowley, Anthony’s Homeport, Edible Seattle, and Parfait Ice Cream for a taste of summer – and all things strawberry!

Strawberry shortcake, strawberry lemonade, strawberry ice cream, and a tasting of local strawberry varieties! There will even be a cash bar available with strawberry margaritas…

Strawberry growers Steve Schuh of Schuh Farms, Chris McKnight of Thulen Farms in the Skagit Valley, and Russ & Dan Picha from Picha Farms in the Puyallup Valley will attend the Strawberry Social and bring the strawberries that are still available to compare and be available to discuss strawberry growing and varieties in the Northwest.

Space is limited to 40 guests, please RSVP by Tuesday, July 6th to info@slowfoodseattle.org with your name and the names of those in your party. We’ll reply with a confirmation that you’re on the list as well as if we’re already at capacity.

Wednesday, July 7, 2010 – 5 to 7pm

Admission:
FREE for Slow Food members and all kids
$5/person for non-member adults
(all donations welcome, cash only at the door)

Location:
Anthony’s HomePort Shilshole Bay
6135 Seaview Ave. NW
Seattle, WA 98107

Join the conversation: Ben Hewitt author of “The Town That Food Saved”

The Town That Food SavedJoin Slow Food Seattle for our first foray towards an ongoing book club. We’ll be doing a combination of partnerships with Kim Ricketts Book Events and connecting with the incredible resources of our local authors. If you’d like to be involved, drop us a line or come to the event this coming Tuesday.

This is the first event in a series on food, sustainability and community called “Edible Conversations” and will take place on June 8th at 7pm at Tom Douglas’ Palace Ballroom. Jill Lightner, the editor of Edible Seattle will interview Ben Hewitt about his life as a farmer, and the way a group of farmers and entrepreneurs banded together to create a comprehensive food system and revive the dying economy of Hardwick, Vermont.

Like many rural communities in America, Hardwick, Vermont was build on a industry that had packed up and left long ago, and the town had suffered from a depressed economy for over a century. With an unemployment rate of 40% and in the middle of a crippling recession, a small group of young farmers and community leaders embarked on a quest to create a comprehensive, functional and vibrant food system, bring jobs to their region and create new ways for them to make a living off their farmlands. As Ben tells the story of his one town’s transformation, there will be lessons for all of us who believe that a healthy, local agricultural system can be the basis of community strength, economic vitality and food security.

Joining Jill and Ben will be local chefs, Sequim farmer Kia Kozun of Nash’s Organic Produce, Chris Curtis, the Director of Seattle’s Neighborhood Farmer’s Markets and Mary Embleton, Director of the Cascade Harvest Coalition.

Brown Paper Tickets

contact us for SFS supporter promo code

**Slow Food Seattle supporters receive a significant discount – contact us for the promo code or sign up for our mailing list to receive directly.**

(Tickets here; RSVP details on Facebook)

The $25/person price includes appetizers and Theo chocolate confections; a cash bar will be available as well. Copies of The Town That Food Saved will be available for purchase and signing at the event.

Ben Hewitt

Kim Ricketts Book EventsEdible Seattle