Slow Food Seattle Day of Service, September 22nd, 2012

Your volunteer power is needed on September 22!

Every year Slow Food Seattle organizes a “Day of Service”. To celebrate Day of Service we ask our members to join us as volunteers to help an organization with common values. Our Board has decided to focus our efforts this year on organizations that are cultivating and harvesting urban-grown food. The Slow Food Seattle Board nominated two great organizations for us to support for Day of Service—City Fruit and Alleycat Acres.

City Fruit promotes the cultivation of urban fruit in order to nourish people, build community and protect the climate. City Fruit helps tree owners grow healthy fruit, provide assistance in harvesting and preserving fruit, promote the sharing of extra fruit, and work to protect urban fruit trees.

Alleycat Acres connects people with food, through community run farms in under-utilized urban spaces.  By farming the cityscape, we are helping to create solutions that address a number of issues facing our communities. Our urban farms lay the groundwork to enable anyone to join in the process of what we refer to as Farming 2.0: cultivating food, relationships, and a connection to our land in an urban setting.

In years past we’ve chosen one organization among those that were nominated. This year the Board was a little indecisive. Since City Fruit and Alleycat Acres are both so worthy we said, “Hey, let’s support both!” It’s a tall task. We think we are up to it, but we need your help. We’re going to need twice as many volunteers this year because on September 22 one team of volunteers is going to help City Fruit and another team is going to help Alleycat Acres.

Board member Rob Salvino will lead the City Fruit volunteer team. Board member Renai Mielke will lead the Alleycat Acres volunteer team. To make things interesting we’re going to have a friendly competition to see who can recruit more volunteers—Rob or Renai. Visit our Facebook event page to learn more about the day’s activities and sign up for Rob’s City Fruit team or Renai’s Alleycat Acres team.

 

Join Team City Fruit!
The Slow Food Seattle volunteers who join Team City Fruit will maintain fruit trees along the Burke-Gilman Trail. The Burke-Gilman Trail Urban Orchard Stewards of the City Fruit program rescued 22 apple and pear trees along 1 1/2 miles of the Burke-Gilman Trail between the University Bridge and Gasworks Park. These trees provide fruit for passersby and for foodbanks. Team City Fruit will be weeding, planting daffodils, spreading mulch, and mooning bicyclists. Actually, that last part was just a joke. Mooning of cyclists will not be allowed. Even without the mooning we will have fun while lending a hand for a worthy cause. More details on time and location to come as the date nears!

Join Team Alleycat Acres!
The Slow Food Seattle volunteers who join Team Alleycat Acres will be working at the newest farm site on East Cherry St. & MLK in the Central District. We’ll be working on putting the garden to bed for winter- laying mulch and cover crops, and planting seeds and bulbs for spring crops. Many of these crops will be later donated to local food banks- delivered exclusively by bicycle! We’ll also have the opportunity to join in with another event happening at the same time – a local honey tasting, and talk with Alleycat’s residential beekeeper from Urban Bee Company. We’ll be meeting at the site at 9 AM and working until 1 PM. Please feel free to join us for any amount of time, or even just pop by around noon to check out the bees! Be sure to dress for the weather, and bring plenty of water.

When you RSVP for this event, please let us know in your comment which group you’d like to team up with. Feel free to bring kids, friends, family, co-workers, neighbors, etc, but please leave pets at home.

See you September 22!

Free Film Screening: “What’s Organic About Organic?” – Monday, August 22

Come watch What’s Organic About Organic – a thought-provoking documentary about the organic food debate – and then stick around to discuss what we can do to promote good, healthy, sustainable food in our community. Join us!

 

 

Please scroll to the bottom of the page in order to RSVP online for this event.

Location
The Q Café
3223 15th Avenue West
Seattle, WA 98119

Directions
Call the Q Cafe at 206.352.2525 for directions. Parking is available in the lot on the north side of the cafe. Additional parking is available in the Quest Church lot, north of the cafe. This lot is accessible from the drive that connects to W. Bertona St.

You are welcome to bring along friends or family! Contact Food & Water Watch organizer Marie Logan at mlogan@fwwatch.org or 415.293.9919 with any questions.

Use this flyer to spread the word about this event!

Co-sponsored by:

What's Organic About Organic?

Bringing Terra Madre Home, Part II- Event tickets on sale now!

On Thursday, November 5th, Slow Food Seattle and FareStart will be hosting a special dinner to raise scholarship funds for the 2010 Slow Food Youth Workshop at the Quillisascut Farm School for the Domestic Art in Rice, Washington.

Guest Chef Karen Jurgensen of the Quillisascut Farm will prepare a three course meal of seasonally available ingredients with wine pairings to bring the taste of the Farm to the dinner guests in Seattle at FareStart. Featured will be the traditional farmstead goat cheeses from the Quillisascut Farm.

A slide show and presentation on the 2009 Slow Food Youth Workshop at the Quillisascut Farm will be presented by Danny Barksdale, Adriana Rose Taylor-Stanley and Amy Grondin.

What: The Slow Food Seattle Quillisascut Farm Student Scholarship Fundraiser

Where: FareStart, 7th & Virginia (downtown Seattle)

When: Thursday, November 5th, 6pm

Cost: $50 per member (plus tax and gratuity) $60 non-members

Purchase tickets today!

http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/86237

Slow Food Youth Workshop at Quillisascut Farm School of the Domestic Arts, August 6-12, 2009

By Amy Grondin

Nina in the garden

Nina in the garden

I was fortunate to have been invited by Lora Lea Misterly to assist her in leading the first Slow Food Youth Workshop at the Quillisascut Farm in the second week of August. Lora Lea and I met each other for the first time in October of 2008 at Terra Madre. Terra Madre is Slow Food International’s biennial meeting that brings together international food communities, cooks, academics and youth delegates for four days to work towards increasing small-scale, traditional, and sustainable food production. In Turino, Italy during the fourth week of October, the third edition of Terra Madre hosted representatives from over 150 countries. The guests together were human links in the food chain, supporting sustainable agriculture, fishing, and breeding with the goal of preserving taste and biodiversity. Once back home in Washington, Lora Lea’s idea to host the week long Slow Food Youth Workshop at the Quillisascut Farm was her way of sharing our experience at Terra Madre with young people who are interested in small scale and sustainable food systems. On the farm 13 youth had a chance to experience life on a working farm. While those attending were all considered youth, between the ages of 18 and 29, they were from varied backgrounds, communities and levels of education. The commonality that brought them all together was a passion for food, a desire to learn about how we produce what we eat and a willingness to open themselves to a completely new vision of what it meant to be part of a food community.

Group photo

Group photo


For most people, food is what they purchase mindlessly from the counters of a grocery store, neatly wrapped, packaged and portioned. Little or no thought goes into where the food is from and how it came to be available to go home in the trunks of cars and find its way to dinner tables. The week on the Quillisascut Farm gave each student a chance to experience milking goats and then creating cheese from the milk in the buckets that were carried from the barn. Vegetables tended in garden were harvested in the morning, washed and chopped in the afternoon to be cooked lovingly for dinner that evening. On goes the list of food that was produced on the farm and prepared with all our hands to nourish us that week – eggs, chickens, apricots, honey, goat – all products of earth and hard work that rewarded each of us with full stomachs and the knowledge of how our meal made its way to the table.

This knowledge also reminded us of our role as members of a food community. We were reminded that as consumers we are not removed from but active participants in our food community. The more educated we are on where and how our food is produced, the more we can support all in our food community – the farmers, harvester, distributors, grocers and other consumers. By making informed purchases we can help to keep the greater communities we live in economically strong and environmentally healthy.

Learning on the farm

Learning on the farm

Each day on the farm offered not only education from working with our hands but also from daily discussions based on powerful words: sustainability, respect, biodiversity, community, grateful and enough. The hour long talks around the 15′ long common table in the Quillisascut Farm’s kitchen invited all to reflect and share how these words are used in our culture and how the meanings of these words could guide us as we develop our own value systems that will lead us through our lives. Each day brought the students greater trust in each other through the shared tasks of farm work. That trust was revealed daily as the students shared more freely of their thoughts during the morning meetings. By the end of the week the 13 strangers who had arrived on the farm had become a community of diverse individuals bound together through shared experiences. They understood that while community is often a place based thing, a community could also be formed by individuals who share common goals, work or ideals.

In an effort to continue to share the lessons learned on the Quillisascut Farm, plans are in the works for the students to make presentations for their local Slow Food chapters based on their experiences from the week. Local Slow Food chapters sponsored half of the tuitions for the students to attend. Reporting back to the local chapters will encourage more sponsorship for future Slow Food youth groups to travel to the Quillisascut Farm.

One such presentation will be led by Danny Barksdsale, a Seattle based chef/instructor at FareStart, and Adriana Rose Taylor-Stanley, a University of Washington student and member of the UW Farms Program. Both individuals were sponsored by Slow Food Seattle to attend the Slow Food Youth Workshop on the Quillisascut Farm. Their presentation will be part of the November dinner prepared by Chef Karen Jurgensen at the FareStart facility in Seattle. The dinner will be held to raise scholarship funds for the 2010 Slow Food Youth workshop. With slide show to offer images of farm life, Danny and Ariana will tell of their shared week on the farm and do their part to add two more youth’s names to the growing community of attendees to the Quillisascut Farm School for Domestic Arts. Additionally, Danny has proposed that he and I work on planning day trips to farms in the Seattle area for the students he teaches at FareStart. FareStart is a nonprofit that helps homeless and disadvantaged individuals achieve self-sufficiency through life skills, job training and employment in the food service industry. Danny wants to somehow share his Quillisascut experience with his Seattle students who most likely have never seen a farm.

Danny surrounded by abundance

Danny surrounded by abundance


I could go on for many more pages about the powerful time that was shared with the students who formed the first group attending the Slow Food Youth Workshop this past August at the Quillisascut Farm. Much more could be said about the beauty of the land and generosity of

Lora Lea and Rick Misterly in opening their home to strangers and for giving us a glance at what they have learned from 30 years of farming. But the best thing would be for Slow Food members to join Danny, Ariana and me at FareStart on November 5th for dinner and conversation about our week on the Quillisascut Farm in Rice, Washington. We invite you to have dinner with us and learn more about the lessons learned on the farm that will help us support and form our own communities, from place based to food based and all in between.

Here are some links for Happy studentsfurther reading:

Terra Madre: http://www.terramadre.info

Quillisascut Farm: http://quillisascut.com

FareStart: http://farestart.org

UW Urban Farm: http://students.washington.edu/uwfarm

Slow Food Seattle co-sponsors KPLU Buy Local Campaign KPLU 88.5 National Public Radio

Slow Food Seattle cordially invites members to write and submit story ideas, personal anecdotes, food-related content and full articles on behalf of our local chapter. Chosen submissions will be included on the KPLU Buy Local website.

In regards to content – Slow Food Seattle would like to use this platform to educate the public using our local and national mission as a guide for all submissions (see below). Otherwise, writers have free rein.  Ideas may include:

.Local, good, clean and fair food/beverage production
.Profiles of food personalities, entrepreneurs or features on like-minded non-profit groups that demonstrate Slow and Local by example
.Local manifestations of Slow Food USA programs
.Local food values or rights work

All submissions will be subject to review – as long as it stays within the guidelines of public radio – no calls to action, or use of comparative words such as largest, best, oldest if it sounds like something heard on a commercial station –it probably doesn’t belong on a public radio station.

Slow Food Seattle is the first organization that has offered to contribute regular content for KPLU so we’re open to ideas on how we can optimize our participation to help educate and inspire our local community about good, clean and fair food for all.

Please direct questions and submit ideas directly to co-chair Lucy Norris at lucy@slowfoodseattle.org.  This is a purely volunteer assignment.  No compensation is being offered for this effort but this is a fine opportunity for members to share their voices and represent Slow Food at the same time.

Thanks in advance! We are excited to engage our members to strengthen the local food community in this way. So far we’ve submitted articles ranging from Community Supported Agriculture to Washington’s sustainable seafood.For more information: www.kplu.org/buylocal